Friday
June 22, 07
V 35 Issue 25

 
 
search only SGN online
Monday, Mar 18, 2019

Lobby

 



 
Hotel
Hate crime inclusion of Transgendered people
Hate crime inclusion of Transgendered people
by - Lisa Wardle SGN Contributing Writer

In New York last year, a Gay man and Transgendered woman were beaten by a group of twelve teenage boys. Bleeding and sore, the victims ran to the precinct across the street where police refused to intervene.

Every year, people are attacked and discriminated against due to their perceived identity. The FBI defines hate crimes as a "criminal offense against a person or property motivated in whole or in part by an offender's bias against a race, religion, disability, ethnic origin or sexual orientation." Nowhere does our federal government take actions to acknowledge and protect Transgendered citizens. Recent reports on biased crimes have created a push for the federal government to include gender orientation as a part of the country's hate crime laws.

Rebecca Stotzer, Public Policy Research Fellow at The Williams Institute stated, "&because there is no federal legislation tracking Transgender hate crime, the rates of violence against trans-people are unclear. However, evidence from advocacy groups suggests that this level of hate crime victimization may be just as severe as other minority groups."

In Stotzer's comparison of hate crime rates across protected and unprotected groups, she noted that the NCAVP's number of reported crimes against Transgendered people reached a total of 321 in the year 2004. That quantity of bias crimes is comparable to the national level of violence against Muslims since 2002.

Though Gay and Bisexual identified citizens are protected through some state laws, only 11 states also include Transgendered individuals in their hate crime statutes.

According to the NCAVP, the percentage of anti-Gay hate crimes committed within the past year decreased by an average of 5%. Certain areas participating in the study reported a greater decrease, with Houston, Texas being the largest difference by having a 60% decline in the number of reported incidents. However, hate crimes against male-to-female Transgendered individuals increased by 20% from 2005-2006.

"This report's findings provide a new perspective that should inform policymakers who are deciding whether to include hate crimes based on sexual orientation and gender identity in federal hate crime laws," noted M. V. Lee Badgett, research director of the Williams Institute. "The numbers show that hate crimes remain a serious problem for the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender communities."

The federal government is not trying their hardest to track the amount of hate crimes against LGBT identified citizens. While the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs has put effort into representing a large populace, the group is currently receiving statistics and reports from only several areas, but numbers from the NCAVP are significantly greater than those documented in the last available FBI report. Only fourteen cities, five states, and one multi-region state participate in the NCAVP study.

"[In] 2005 (the last year for which FBI hate crime statistics are available), only 1,017 bias-related incidents based on sexual orientation (including 21 based on anti-heterosexual sentiment) were contained in the FBI's data representing 82.6 precent of the nation's population, whereas NCAVP captured 1,393 incidents in areas representing only 26.6 percent of the nation's population," stated the 2006 NCAVP report.

If Congress would approve the inclusion of gender identity to the national hate crime definition and prosecution process, hopefully, the FBI would follow suit and begin to accurately report the incidents that occur. Certain groups have been providing the statistics that are necessary to prove Transgendered people should be protected.

ads

ads
ads
ads
ads
ads
ads
ads
ads
ads
SGN
Seattle Gay Blog
post your own information on
the Seattle Gay Blog


copyright Seattle Gay News - DigitalTeamWorks 2007