Wednesday, Oct 21, 2020
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 36 YEARS!
Wednesday, Oct 21, 2020
click to go to click to visit advertiser's website


 
 
 

 

Speakeasy Speed Test

Cost of the
War in Iraq
(JavaScript Error)
 

 

click to go to advertisers website
 
UMO Ensemble performs Rubble Women
UMO Ensemble performs Rubble Women
by Miryam Gordon - SGN A&E Writer

Rubble Women
Directed by Sheila Daniels
UMO Ensemble at David Smith Furniture Warehouse
Through March 15


War is shit, and after war is shit, too. Bet you didn't know that after World War II, there were thousands of tons of broken brick all over Europe. In Germany, 65,000 women from age 15 to 65 were conscripted to move the bricks, by hand, to clean up after the war. This is the story that Rubble Women enacts as a fascinating movement/spoken word/ritual piece produced by UMO Ensemble. UMO Ensemble has always created theatrical stories that include movement and non-linear techniques to enhance the performance.

Such is the experience they provide in David Smith Furniture Warehouse, in this cold (really cold) and bleak environment. Seven women move bricks, tell stories, support each other and even find ways to have fun, all while being trapped into this backbreaking work. The main story they tell is a fairytale of a young woman who is inadvertently traded to the devil for wealth by her unknowing father. It's a brutal tale, with the young woman having her hands cut off. Yet she perseveres with dignity, grace, and forgiveness.

The ensemble, Mik Kuhlman, Tracy Hyland, Carina Jingrot, Kajsa Ingemansson, Elizabeth Klob, Martha Ension, and Amy Rider, dance through this one-act, exemplifying the fairytale woman's grace and dignity. Their voices are clarion calls to each other to stay awake, alive, and unafraid. Musical accompaniment, composed and performed by Gretta Harley, provides rhythm, song and atmosphere to the work.

The information provided to the audience on an exhibit poster explains each woman's archetypal character, like the Little Match Girl, and Hecuba. While it's interesting to read and reflect on after you see the production, that information seems most useful to the actors themselves as they work to produce this work. Their characters on stage are not delineated separately enough to catch the ways they implement their archetypes. Fundamentally, though, you don't need to know anything about the women in World War II, or fairytales, or archetypes. All you'll need to know is provided in this riveting performance (almost a pun).

Dress very warmly, since you'll be sitting in a very cold warehouse and they have to turn off their heaters during the performance. It's about 90 minutes straight through and after a while all the heat leaves. The company thoughtfully provides some blankets to grab on your way in.

For more information, go to www.umo.org or www.brownpapertickets.com or call 800-838-3006.

Comments on reviews go to sgncritic@gmail.com.

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
Seattle Gay Blog post your own information on
the Seattle Gay Blog
 


: http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
copyright Seattle Gay News - DigitalTeamWorks 2009

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News