Thursday, Nov 21, 2019
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 36 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website



Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 

 

Speakeasy Speed Test

 
 
click to go to advertisers website
 
Section One
ALL STORIES
  next story
National News

by Rex Wockner SGN Contributing Writer

D.C. recognizes Gay marriages from elsewhere
The District of Columbia began recognizing same-sex marriages from elsewhere on July 7.

Gay couples can marry in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Iowa, Belgium, Canada, the Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, Spain and Sweden. They also will be able to marry in the next two to five months in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont.

"To have our legal marriages recognized and defended as a matter of human rights in our nation's capital sets a new threshold for other jurisdictions," said Rea Carey, executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force.

"For myself and for the other countless same-sex married couples residing in the District of Columbia, this marks a new day for all of us."

A proposed voter referendum to repeal the new D.C. law was rejected in court on the grounds that denying legal equality to same-sex couples would violate the district's Human Rights Act.

Chad Gibson goes home
Chad Gibson has been released from the hospital but still is in danger from a blood clot on his brain that reportedly could break loose and kill him.

Gibson allegedly was beat up by cops during a June 28 raid of the Rainbow Lounge in Fort Worth, Tex. Witnesses say officers slammed his head into a wall, then into the floor. Two other patrons also were injured in the raid - one has broken ribs and one has a broken thumb.

June 28 was the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots that kickstarted the modern Gay-rights movement.

The violent raid - purported to be merely one of the state's routine checks of bars to be sure no one is too drunk - brought heavy condemnation from Gay leaders, newspaper columnists, bloggers, politicians and others. It also received extensive national news coverage.

Both the Fort Worth Police Department and the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission, which joined in the raid, have launched internal investigations of the incident. The results of the city police's investigation will be reviewed by federal authorities, Mayor Mike Moncrief has promised.

Apart from the raid itself, the most controversial aspect of the incident has been Police Chief Jeff Halstead's assertions that Gibson groped one of the officers and that other patrons made what the Police Department called "sexually explicit movements" toward uniformed officers - claims that bar patrons and Gay leaders have called preposterous and "lies."

"You're touched and advanced in certain ways by people inside the bar, that's offensive," Halstead said shortly after the raid. "I'm happy with the restraint used when they were contacted like that."

After facing ridicule for those improbable assertions, Halstead has since adopted a more conciliatory tone, telling Gay people at a public meeting: "We've got to work together. Be patient, and you will see that this is just not lip service. I will meet with you wherever you want to meet. I will go to your restaurants, your house, we can eat barbecue, whatever you want to do. But we've got to talk."

Gibson, for his part, wants the raiding officers to be prosecuted and the city to halt its "cover-up."

"You used excessive force and that's why I got hurt," Gibson told WFAA-TV. "They have blamed it on me, that I was drunk, [that] I fell and hit my head, I groped the officer, I did this, I did that. You know what? No. Accept responsibility."

In an interview with KTVT, Gibson added: "I was rubbed into the concrete. ... I'm just appalled that they took it to the level that they did. ... They need to accept responsibility for what they did."

Group behind federal marriage suit rejects intervention by old-guard Gay rights legal groups
The American Foundation for Equal Rights, the group challenging Proposition 8 in federal court with superstar attorneys Ted Olson and David Boies, is strongly opposing an attempt by the American Civil Liberties Union, Lambda Legal and the National Center for Lesbian Rights to intervene in the case.

In a scathing July 8 letter to the groups, AFER Board Chair Chad Griffin wrote: "Given our willingness to collaborate with you, and your efforts to undercut this case, we were surprised and disappointed when we became aware of your desire to intervene. You have unrelentingly and unequivocally acted to undermine this case even before it was filed. ... [W]e will vigorously oppose any motion to intervene. In public and private, you have made it unmistakably clear that you strongly disagree with our legal strategy to challenge Prop. 8 as a violation of the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the United States Constitution. Your strident criticism of our suit has been constant."

Besides being teed off about that, Griffin also said the groups' proposed intervention will slow the case down.

"Your intervention would create a complex, multi-party proceeding that would inevitably be hampered by procedural inefficiencies that are directly at odds with our goal - and the goal of Chief Judge Walker - of securing an expeditious, efficient, and inexpensive resolution to the district court proceedings. As a result of your intervention, we could be mired in procedurally convoluted pre-trial maneuvering for years - while Gay and Lesbian individuals in California continue to suffer the daily indignity of being denied their federal constitutional right to marry the person of their choosing. ... Delaying equal marriage rights in California serves none of our interests."

In a press release, the three legal groups - which have a history of fighting for same-sex marriage only on the state level - said they want to intervene on behalf of the Our Family Coalition, Lavender Seniors of the East Bay, and Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays in order "to illustrate for the court the diverse needs of their members and the ... LGBT community generally to provide the full factual record Judge Walker said will help the appellate courts as they decide whether LGBT people in California have the same basic rights as the Golden State's heterosexual population."

But for Griffin, it seemed to be a matter of too little too late. In his letter he quoted hostile and snarky public remarks from leaders of the three groups, who have called the Olson/Boies suit "a temptation we should resist," "an attempt to short-circuit the process" and "risky and premature."

He also quoted Matt Coles, director of the ACLU's Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender & AIDS Project, as telling The New York Times: "Federal court. Wow. Never thought of that."

Griffin said the groups' hostility came despite multiple attempts by AFER to bring the groups into the case earlier in the project.

The groups have opposed the Olson/Boies suit - and, in reality, still do - because they fear the U.S. Supreme Court is not ready to let same-sex couples marry.

AFER disagrees, saying that the U.S. Supreme Court has already said, in the Colorado Amendment 2 case in 1996, that governments cannot deprive a single class of citizens of constitutional rights for no purpose other than animus and moral disapproval.

In that ruling, the court said Amendment 2, via which Colorado voters banned Colorado governments from enacting Gay rights laws, was unconstitutional because it "seems inexplicable by anything but animus toward the class that it affects; it lacks a rational relationship to legitimate state interests."

AFER, Olson and Boies say Prop 8 does exactly the same thing. They also have cited other U.S. Supreme Court precedents to bolster their case, including Lawrence v. Texas, the 2003 case in which the court struck down all remaining state bans on Gay sex, and Loving v. Virginia, the 1967 case that banished all remaining state laws against interracial marriage.

Should Prop 8 be struck down, the ruling also could extend to 30 other states that, like California, have amended their constitutions to ban same-sex marriage. Six states have legalized same-sex marriage.

In the end, the Olson/Boies case could be both risky and legally sound. One key question is whether the U.S. Supreme Court would be willing to issue a ruling consistent with the Amendment 2 case if that meant effectively legalizing same-sex marriage in all 50 states. Or, if the court opted for a narrower ruling, whether it even would be willing to set the precedent of re-legalizing same-sex marriage only in California.

Meanwhile, in related groundbreaking news, Massachusetts sued the federal government July 8 over the Defense of Marriage Act, under which the federal government refuses to recognize married Gay couples as married and treat them as such.

The state said the federal law interferes with states' right to define marriage, is overreaching and discriminatory, denies married Gay couples myriad federal benefits and equal treatment, requires the state to violate its citizens' constitutional rights in matters such as Medicaid eligibility determinations, and "codified an animus towards Gay and Lesbian people."

"In enacting DOMA, Congress overstepped its authority," the suit says.

The National Center for Lesbian Rights and other national gay rights groups applauded the move.

"The lawsuit filed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts challenging the federal DOMA is an important landmark in the struggle to end the long history of invidious government discrimination against (LGBT) people," said NCLR Executive Director Kate Kendell. "We applaud the Massachusetts Attorney General for her leadership in standing up for the rights of same-sex couples and their families. This case recognizes that for far too long, same-sex couples who are legally married under state law have been denied the protections that are provided under federal law to other families in Massachusetts. The harms to these families in being denied more than 1,000 federal rights, protections, benefits, and obligations are tangible and extremely well-documented. There is no constitutional justification for discrimination against these families by their own national government. We applaud the actions of the state, and urge swift action to bring down DOMA."

With assistance from Bill Kelley

Share on Facebook  Share on Facebook

Post to MySpace!Share on MySpace!

    Share on Delicious

Share on StumbleUpon!

pictures - top: Kate Kendell
above: David Boies
bottom: Ted Olson
Bill Clinton backs same-sex marriage
------------------------------
US Senate passage expected Monday on Matthew Shepard Hate Crimes Act
------------------------------
American Episcopalians vote full ordination to GLBT clergy
------------------------------
Massachusetts sues on DOMA
------------------------------
Fort Worth protests against bar raid continue
------------------------------
QLAW announces monthly GLBT legal clinic
------------------------------
Metropolitan Community Churches support Gay clergy
------------------------------
Faith and Freedom Network actively seeking signatures
------------------------------
Mike Webb murder trial ends in 20-year sentence
------------------------------
Cast of HAIR to join march on Washington
------------------------------
SGN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Port Commission candidate Rob Holland
------------------------------
Bill seeks to end the ban on syringe exchange programs
------------------------------
Rise 'n Shine benefits from Northwest Bears' Spring Thaw
------------------------------
The Outfield: SpiderBaby: The Twin Cities favorite (Gay) wrestler
------------------------------
Seattle Pride Parade '09
------------------------------
Join the Impact volunteers have just made a video to remind voters just how much is at stake for Washington families if Referendum 71 qualifies for the ballot.
------------------------------
BREAKING NEWS
------------------------------
Tom Duane unleashed
------------------------------
Mormon 'kiss-in' in Utah leads to shouting match
------------------------------
Gay Marriage and the Constitution: Why Ted Olson and I are working to overturn California's Proposition 8.
------------------------------
Ice-cold shoulder given as gay penguin couple splits
------------------------------
PGN publisher's Cronkite disruption & later personal friendship
------------------------------

------------------------------
Senate approves hate-crimes measure
------------------------------

------------------------------
Salt Lake City kissing protest brings cheers, jeers (with multimedia)

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
Seattle Gay Blog post your own information on
the Seattle Gay Blog
 

http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml
copyright Seattle Gay News - DigitalTeamWorks 2009

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News