Wednesday, Nov 13, 2019
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 36 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 

 

Speakeasy Speed Test

 
 
click to go to advertisers website
 
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
New Moon, same demographic
by Scott Rice - SGN Contributing Writer

The Twilight Saga: New Moon
Opening November 20


Bella Swan (the long-suffering Kristen Stewart) is a total dumbass. I mean, I've heard of difficult love triangles, but this girl gets herself caught between a vampire and a werewolf. I know the pickings can be slim in a small town, but please, a vampire and a werewolf? This doesn't seem, uh, wise.

But cute chicks always dig the bad boys. The Twilight Saga: New Moon simply takes that notion to its extreme. As improbable as it may seem, this tweener dream flick tells the story of Bella Swan, Forks High School senior and pickup-driving gal who's way to cool for small town USA, and who can't stop falling for monsters.

In fact, this isn't improbable at all - hyperbolic, maybe, but not improbable.

Cheers to all the straight nice guys out there that won't get the girl of his dreams because some whim of nature turns women into puddles of hormones when they get a whiff of those bad boy pheromones. Bad boys are sexy.

New Moon is all about the young men. Okay, it's all about 14-year-old girls who will pay to see handsome young men shirtless over and over and buy pencils and lip gloss with pictures and logos. Director Chris Weitz (The Golden Compass and About a Boy) doesn't let them down.

In classic example of objectification worthy of a beer commercial, Edward (Robert Pattinson) makes a stunning, and sort of silly, entrance. Edward steps out of his Volvo SUV (his sweet little C30 has been replaced by a behemoth) and walks toward the camera in slow-mo with fan-induced wind blowing across his pasty face. I'm sure there was music involved, but I wouldn't know as the theater erupted with shrill shrieks of adolescent girls.

Jacob's (Taylor are-you-really-only-17 Lautner) first entrance is considerably less contrived. However, when his pecs make their debut a bit later, the director's meddling bubbles up again and the crowd melts down on cue. You see, Bella bumps her head, so how else is a starry-eyed wolf-boy supposed to staunch the bleeding? Off with the shirt!

The young men are handsome. The movie folks in Hollywood know how to cast a flick aimed squarely at the tweener girls. Pattinson is all rangy poetic beauty, lithe and pale. Lautner, who I had to keep reminding myself wasn't even born when Steve and I started dating, is all animal intensity and buffed-out mega male.

What about Stewart as the none-too-savvy center of the ghoulish triangle? She's lovely, and she can act. I just can't get past seeing interviews where she looks bored while lamenting the pitfalls of fame. I have to go with Chelsea Handler on this one, and here's my message to Stewart: Not being famous is easy. Quit being in movies, dumbass. Believe me, every sweating, shrieking, Twilight-addled little girl in that theater would trade places with you in a minute. Don't take your fans for granted, even if they wear candy necklaces and write the names of boys on their tennis shoes. You're a hero to them, so don't be a jerk.

This movie is made for 14-year-old girls, and they won't find lines like "You're my only reason to stay alive - if that's what I am" and "Sometimes I feel like I'm going to disappear" and "I've gotta go; I have vampire to kill" as insipidly cliché as I do, but they haven't heard them as many times as I have. I also won't go home and write my boyfriend's name on my notebook over and over tonight while listening to the Jonas Brothers. I suppose we're even.

That's why nothing I have to say matters. This movie will make a bazillion dollars and everything will be fine. And there were some things I enjoyed about New Moon.

The young cast members are excellent actors. They get away with almost all the aforementioned insipidly cliché dialogue - no easy feat.

The hero, Bella, is a fearless female character that likes motorcycles and cliff diving and old pickups. She also stands up to monsters over and over. You wouldn't have seen this character in a movie this big 20 years ago.

New Moon has a sense of humor that was painfully lacking in the first film. The humor doesn't always work, but at least you get the idea the filmmakers aren't taking themselves so seriously this time around.

Perhaps the best part of seeing New Moon happened before the movie even started. I sat there reading my December issue of Harper's, when who should take a seat on my right but Michael Medved. It was sublime. I couldn't decide whether to hit on him in a subtle way so he wouldn't be sure that's what happened until he was driving home, or to tell him how much his book, Whatever Happened to the Class of 65, affected me when I was 12 years old and I stole it from my older sister. I also considered asking what made him turn to the dark side, but I decided I'd just look that up later on Wikipedia.


Oscars all around for The Blind Side
by Rajkhet Dirzhud-Rashid - SGN A&E Writer

The Blind Side
Now Playing


According to my sweetie, an expert in Chinese and Vedic astrology, Sandra Bullock's a "fire tiger." Since next year falls in a fire tiger sign, that could mean good things for the perky (and now blonde) actress. All I know is that her performance in The Blind Side (based on a true story) is one of the best I've ever seen Ms. Bullock turn in in a film loaded with excellent acting chops, including that of newcomer Quinton Aaron (who plays a homeless kid who becomes a national football superstar).

Bullock plays a sports mom of two wonderful kids (Jae Head, and Lily Collins), who takes an interest in a quiet black teen after she finds him while she and her family are on their way home one night.

"What's he wearing?" she asks her husband (Tim McGraw, and no, not the country music star). She pulls up beside him and asks the kid, who is dressed in a long T-shirt and short pants and oversize sneakers, where he's going. "To the gym," he says in a quiet monotone and continues on his way, a resigned slope to his massive shoulders.

After a moment's deliberation, Bullock, a feisty go-getter of a woman, makes her husband pull the car around and insists the kid come with them. This starts a long association in a Southern town as Bullock helps a coach who gets the kid into the Christian school where he works. The coach was contacted by a mechanic the kid lives with, since the kid's mom is so addicted to crack she can't even remember his father's name. They also eventually get the teachers on board with their helping effort, although the teachers at first think the kid's academics will fail him in a more scholastically challenging environment.

Everyone is pleasantly surprised as the quiet giant, who writes about feeling isolated in the all-white school, and this is the beauty of The Blind Side. The film is reminiscent of other sports-related films like The Mighty Ducks and Remember the Titans, only this film is much more of a tribute to one young man's incredible courage and his ability to lift himself out of the extreme poverty and violence of his "project" life and make a mark in the world of sports. It's also a joy to watch Bullock work with the inimitable Cathy Bates (who plays a quirky and determined tutor who helps the kid get his grades up to qualify for a football scholarship to Old Miss).

Definitely at the top of many lists (including my own) this year, The Blind Side is one of the most moving films to come out of Hollywood in a long time, and one that sets the tone for other holiday movies to come. Also, you need not worry that this is going to be one that will leave you with a cloyingly sweet aftertaste, as there's enough grit and intensity and realism in this film to satisfy even the most cynical moviegoer. Heck, even the Gossip Girl wannabes who sat behind me at the screening were sniffling at the end, and many clapped and cheered as the credits rolled, featuring the real-life football player and the family who rescued him in snapshots. Go see it and take a few hankies, because - trust me - this one will bring the tears and warm your heart right up.

Also, in a fair world, not only will Bullock get an Oscar nod, but young Jae Head, who plays her outspoken son, should get one, too, as should young Quinton Aaron, who plays the dispossessed young man with such heartfelt realism. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for Bullock next year.


The Box an easy, fun Hollywood flick
by Scott Rice - SGN Contributing Writer

The Box
Now Playing


Here's the deal: Some guy leaves a box with a button on your doorstep. He lets you know that if you push the button, you'll get one million dollars. Sounds good, right? But if you push the button, someone you don't know will die. That complicates things?

The Box is a fun morality tale wrapped up as a quasi-sci-fi thriller set in '70s-era suburbia. Sure, there are more loose ends than a busy Saturday night at The Cuff, but who cares. I recommend you go the theater, get some popcorn, and sit back to enjoy seeing good folks make bad decisions and get their unseemly comeuppance from a mysterious dude with a really bad complexion.

Norma (Cameron Diaz) and Arthur (James Marsden) are a young couple with a boy named Walter (Sam Oz Stone). Norma teaches at a private school while Arthur plugs away as a research scientist while dreaming of getting into the astronaut program at NASA. A mysterious stranger, Arlington Steward (Frank Langella), leaves the titular box at their door. In a moment of mercurial miscalculation, Norma presses the button.

The story is pretty simple. The consequences are, too. The filmmaking isn't.

Richard Kelly has proven he knows how to challenge us cinematically. His Donnie Darko causes only slightly fewer arguments among film geeks than Mulholland Drive, yet it is fascinating to watch whether you buy in or not. Southland Tales, the sprawling apocalyptic tale set in a futuristic L.A., takes a bit more patience, but is still completely original and intriguing. With The Box, he seems to be telling us, and Hollywood, that he can go mainstream. That's another way of saying he can give good box office.

Steven Soderbergh and Gus Van Sant are excellent at the "one for them, one for us" filmmaking schedule. Hopefully, Kelly can find a similar groove, tossing off well-crafted Hollywood movies between his movies that make us work for it.

Langella is a veteran actor who finally got some overdue props in 2008 for Frost/Nixon. He has a long resume that includes stage and screen. It would be easy to overlook his performance with its understated, creepy, and unemotional take on Arlington Steward, an un-villain who may or may not be dead and may or may not be an alien, I'm not telling. That said, he's perfect in the role.

James Marsden need do nothing but stand there.

In light of that erudite observation, I have some advice for Ms. Diaz: Never ever, for the rest of your well-deserved and successful career, under any circumstances, share the screen with Mr. Marsden again. And if you do share the screen with Mr. Marsden again under some unfortunate circumstance, do not allow them to put you in an another scene with him in a wet T-shirt. It does you no favors. He's more attractive than you.

The Box won't change your life. But if you want to get out of the rain for a while and watch a good movie, this is your ticket. The story is fun, the actors are excellent, and the cinematography is awesome. Don't expect to go for coffee afterward and hammer out the plot details; however, due to the terrific '70s-inspired set design you will see the best wallpaper since Barton Fink.




Seattle primps for Red Dress Party
------------------------------
New Mr. and Miss Gay Seattle crowned at pageant
------------------------------
Innovative Pixies amaze at Paramount
------------------------------
Hip-hop homophobia: A filmmaker takes on anti-Gay messages in rap music
------------------------------
Cabaret festival overflowing with talent
------------------------------
A Dyke About Town: New Orleans, Jazz Alley, and Ham for the Holidays
------------------------------
Diviners succeeds on young lead's skill
------------------------------
St. Louis a taste of holiday spirit
------------------------------

------------------------------
Jon Stewart - The Daily Show - Gay Watch
------------------------------

------------------------------
New Moon, same demographic
------------------------------
Oscars all around for The Blind Side
------------------------------
The Box an easy, fun Hollywood flick
------------------------------
John/Joel, KISS, Clarkson all arrive in November
------------------------------
Q-Scopes by Jack Fertig
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
Northwest News
------------------------------

------------------------------
Surviving swine flu and gift guidelines
------------------------------

------------------------------
Deep Inside Hollywood - Romeo San Vicente
------------------------------

------------------------------
Book Marks
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
Seattle Gay Blog post your own information on
the Seattle Gay Blog
 

 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml
copyright Seattle Gay News - DigitalTeamWorks 2009

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News