Wednesday, Nov 13, 2019
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 40 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website




 

 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, November 1 2013 - Volume 41 Issue 44
AIDS: Still no easy answers - Study suggests finding a cure might be harder than we thought
Section One
ALL STORIES
  next story
AIDS: Still no easy answers - Study suggests finding a cure might be harder than we thought

by Mike Andrew - SGN Staff Writer

A new study released October 24 shows that reserves of dormant HIV 'hidden' in infected T cells may be much higher than previously thought. The findings cast doubt on the effectiveness of so-called 'shack and kill' AIDS cures.

The journal Cell published the study, which was done by scientists at Johns Hopkins University. It is the most comprehensive study to date of HIV proviruses, or dormant forms of the virus.

According to the research, potentially active, dormant forms of HIV hiding in infected immune T cells may be as much as 60 times greater than previously believed.

UNEXPECTED RESILIENCE
The hidden HIV, researchers say, acts as a latent reservoir of functional proviruses that may remain in a person's body long after antiretroviral drug therapy has successfully brought viral replication to a standstill. If antiretroviral therapy is stopped or interrupted, some proviruses can reactivate.

Study results showed that among 213 HIV proviruses isolated from the reservoirs of eight patients and initially unresponsive to highly potent biological stimuli, some 12% could still become active at a later date. These proviruses were capable of replicating their genetic material and transmitting infection to other cells.

According to senior researcher Robert Siliciano, all of these unresponsive proviruses had previously been thought to be defective, with no possible ability to restart the disease. Most did, in fact, turn out to be defective, Siliciano said, but not all.

That means the new findings pose a serious problem for AIDS cures based on the so-called 'shock and kill' strategy.

'Shock and kill' means forcing dormant proviruses to 'turn back on,' making them 'visible' and vulnerable to the immune system's cytolytic, or 'killer,' T cells, and then eliminating every last infected cell from the body while antiretroviral drugs prevent any new cells from becoming infected.

A TRUER PICTURE
Lead researcher Ya-Chi Ho said the team's investigation of 'the true size' of the dormant reservoir was prompted by a large discrepancy between two different techniques for measuring how much provirus is in immune system cells.

The initial approach of counting only reactivated proviruses yielded numbers that were 300-fold lower than her team's DNA-based technique used to gauge how many total proviral copies, both dormant and reactivated, are present, she said.

'If medical researchers are ever going to lure out and reactivate latent HIV, then we need to better understand exactly how much of it is really there,' Ho said.

In the latest study, researchers sequenced, or spelled out, the entire genetic code of HIV proviruses that reactivated as well as those that could not be induced to do so. While 88% of the proviruses that could not be reactivated were defective and would never replicate, the remainder had fully intact genomes and could become active in the future.

Further lab experiments on the cloned proviruses showed that the intact but still dormant proviruses could be reconstructed to produce active virus, which in turn could replicate in human immune cells, restarting the HIV infection.

Statistical modeling later showed these figures equated to a 60-fold increase in the dormant HIV reservoir when compared to the old method of counting only reactivated viruses. Additional experiments showed that repeated chemical stimuli could reactivate proviruses that failed to respond to initial attempts at reactivation.

BENEFITS OF STUDY
Ho says the study results, although discouraging, will energize HIV researchers to refine and improve methods for detecting proviruses capable of reactivation.

Siliciano said the new data could also cause scientists to look for alternative approaches to a cure, including renewed efforts to develop a therapeutic vaccine to stimulate immune system cells that attack and kill all HIV.

'Our study results certainly show that finding a cure for HIV disease is going to be much harder than we had thought and hoped for,' he said.

Siliciano is helping to organize a November conference in San Francisco, jointly sponsored by Cell and The Lancet, entitled 'What Will It Take to Achieve an AIDS-Free World?'

Tell a friend:

Share on Facebook  Share on Facebook

Post to MySpace!Share on MySpace!

    Share on Delicious

Share on StumbleUpon!

Thousands march for marriage in Illinois - Cancellation of 'veto session' leaves equality bill in limbo toward common goals
------------------------------
SGN exclusive interview: Tom Ammiano - California Gay activist is fighting for a livable minimum wage
------------------------------
Hawaii Senate passes marriage equality - House approval nearly certain; governor says he will sign
------------------------------
Vote Yes on I-522 - Whether or not GMOs are 'safe,' we have a right to know if they're there
------------------------------
A little taste of Deutschland in Seattle
------------------------------
Murray campaign cleared of alleged ethics violation - No evidence found to support McGinn's charge of collusion with donors
------------------------------
Fighting for the majority in 2014 - The progressive campaign to recapture the State Senate starts now
------------------------------
Unplug yourself at CAMP - Q-Squared offers men community, personal growth, and fun
------------------------------
Missouri Supreme Court denies partner benefits suit
------------------------------
Oy vey! Will soy turn you Gay? Rabbi says soybean 'hormones' could have unbiblical side effects
------------------------------
Grindr or meat grinder? Too many men let unexamined prejudice dictate their dating behavior
------------------------------
Thousands march with Pride in Taipei
------------------------------
AIDS: Still no easy answers - Study suggests finding a cure might be harder than we thought
------------------------------
Jesse's Journal: Florida Democrats and LGBT Rights
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
BREAKING NEWS
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
Seattle Gay Blog post your own information on
the Seattle Gay Blog
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1605 12 Ave., Ste. 31
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News - DigitalTeamWorks 2013

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News