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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, March 13, 2015 - Volume 43 Issue 11
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Disney's new Cinderella a 'Bibbity Bobbity' beauty
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

CINDERELLA
Now playing


If a dream is a wish your heart makes when you're half asleep, then Disney's live action take on their animated classic Cinderella (and, much like that 1950 favorite, it only utilizes the most basic of elements found in Charles Perrault's timeless fairy tale) is the blissful fruition of that hopeful fantasizing. Directed with the same verve, elegance and simplicity auteur Kenneth Branagh once upon a time brought to his Shakespeare epics like Much Ado About Nothing, scripted with somewhat surprising warmth and intelligence by Chris Weitz (About a Boy), this sparkling, effervescent family epic is a melodious revelation. Bottom line, the film is magical, and as early 2015 shockers are concerned, this might just be the biggest - and most delectably joyous - one of them all.

The story itself has not changed. Her mother (a blink and you'll not realize it's Hayley Atwell) gone at far too early an age, her father (a poignantly subdued Ben Chaplin) struck down by illness just when he's remarried, young Ella (Lily James) refuses to let life's tragedies destroy her. Not an easy trick, though, when one's conniving, duplicitous Stepmother (Cate Blanchett) spoils her own two selfishly ugly daughters Drisella (Sophie McShera) and Anastasia (Holliday Grainger) while transforming her stepchild into nothing more than a put-upon servant. Yet through it all, Ella refuses to break, refuses to give in, finding courage in kindness, letting her love for life and its myriad of mysteries to speak for itself no matter what calamities might befall her.

We all know what happens next. The Prince (Richard Madden) - here sporting the nickname 'Kit' - by the command of his father the King (Derek Jacobi) is having a ball, a dance where every eligible maiden in the land is ordered to attend whether they be royal or commoner. Ella is banned from going by her Stepmother, but thanks to the magical machinations of her kindly Fairy Godmother (Helena Bonham Carter), as well as a giant pumpkin, a goose, a pair of lizards and quartet of helpful mice, she'll not only go but she'll go in style.

The chimes of midnight will echo throughout the land. A Prince will be left perplexed, holding a shimmering glass slipper as the woman who has stolen his heart disappears into the night. A wicked Stepmother will attempt to put the pieces of a perplexing puzzle together. As for Ella, for her this dream has appeared to come to an end, leaving her with tender, beautifully intoxicating memories that will make this and all future hardships far easier to overcome and prevail over had the evening's events gone in any other direction.

Branagh and Weitz do not reinvent the wheel. There are no huge twists or crazy surprises thrown into this mélange, director and writer more than content to let the story speak for itself and nothing more. At the same time, they do manage to make Ella her own woman all the same, allowing her to embrace her new name of 'Cinderella,' given to her in an attempt at mockery and jest by her step family, in ways that feel powerful and poignant. More, she isn't a woman looking only to be swept off her feet into the arms of a loving man. She is her own person and she's proud of that fact, attempting to live up to the highest of ideals instilled in her by her late mother and father, refusing to be with anyone if they are unable to accept and cherish that fact.

James, best known for her turn as Lady Rose MacClare on 'Downton Abby,' is a revelation, elegant and refined yet also playful and ebullient. She crafts a strikingly three-dimensional portrait that is both decidedly feminine yet is also distinctly her own person, embracing her mother's edicts revolving around courage, kindness and love that feel natural and organic. She is fiercely intelligent, yet also still a youngster, evolving into the woman she wants to be, her interior contradictions constantly in flux as she learns to make her way in a world that offers hardship and opportunity alike yet not always both in equal measure.

As for Blanchett, Branagh gives her the full movie star treatments, and from her first appearance to her last she dominates as only a talent of her caliber can. She glides through the film like a serpent waiting to strike, the way she weaves her Machiavellian plots - a scene between her and the Grand Duke, played with suitably oleaginous conviction by the great Stellan Skarsgård, particularly glorious - fascinating start to finish. While she didn't go beyond anything I anticipated, Blanchett cagily underplays her hand the majority of the time, allowing her more feral and ferocious outbursts to draw far more in the way of blood than they otherwise would have.

As for the director himself, without question this is Branagh's finest work in decades, probably since he presented Hamlet in all its 242-minute glory way back in 1996. The film is lithe, bouncing to and fro in ways recalling the great Vincente Minnelli musicals of the 1950s, recalling the cheery sophistication of classics like The Pirate, The Band Wagon and Gigi. Haris Zambarloukos' (Locke) camera feasts upon Dante Ferretti's (Gangs of New York) sumptuous production design and Sandy Powell's (Into the Woods) stunning costumes, all of the technical aspects working in harmonious symmetry one with the other in ways that are continually inspiring.

Paying homage to both the Disney animated classic as well the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, this new take on Cinderella isn't going to make anyone look at the fairy tale anew with fresh eyes. But Branagh's film is still glorious, the end product a bewitching love story of strength, perseverance and imagination that I found virtually impossible to resist. As dreams go, here's hoping my fondness for this one never dissipates, keeping my heart young and my spirit soaring for a longtime to come. 'Bibbity Bobbity Boo' indeed.


Heavy-handed Run a melodramatic insult
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

RUN ALL NIGHT
Now playing


Notorious hitman Jimmy 'The Gravedigger' Conlon (Liam Neeson) and revered crime boss Shawn Maguire (Ed Harris) have a long history as brothers in arms going back to their military days. They're so close the former's descent into alcohol-fueled self-pity isn't enough to remove him from the latter's good graces, both knowing that when the time comes to be judged they'll likely be crossing the line to the Pearly Gates together hand-in-hand.

In one night, however, everything changes, Jimmy making a choice that will not only end his friendship with Shawn, but one that will put the pair at the most lethal of odds. A victim of staggeringly tragic coincidence, the enforcer's son Mike (Joel Kinnaman), a family man who has managed to escape his father's violent world and make a legitimate, law-abiding life all his own, witnesses a brutal murder committed by the mobster's mentally unhinged kid Danny (Boyd Holbrook). It's unfortunate happenstance, the former childhood acquaintances gob-smacked by the stupid dumb luck that's befallen them.

At first sent by Shawn to ease tensions between the two young men, Jimmy is forced to kill his best friend's boy in order to save his own son's life. Now every gun in New York, including the majority of those carried by the police, are intent on finding the duo. With nowhere to turn, Jimmy and Mike must put their differences aside if they are going to make it to the morning alive, desperately looking for a way to escape Shawn's wrath even if that means turning to the only honest cop, dogged Detective Harding (Vincent D'Onofrio), either of them are aware of.

If nothing else, the new thriller Run All Night features one of the strongest casts to grace a motion picture so far this year. Along with those already mentioned the film features supporting turns from the likes of Nick Nolte, Common, Bruce McGill, Holt McCallany, Genesis Rodriguez and an absolutely unrecognizable Lois Smith, most of them admittedly having precious little to do save give the film a grittier, more rugged milieu and little else. Without a doubt, it's director Jaume Collett-Serra's most ambitious and adult-oriented entertainment yet, the motion picture light years beyond his previous B-grade sojourns with Neeson Unknown and Non-Stop.

But as self-contained and as relatively solid as writer Brad Ingelsby's (Out of the Furnace) script might be, for whatever reason, comma Collett-Serra presents the material in the same, flashy, giddily over-the-top manner that he has his previous works. He never allows his cast room to breathe, refuses to let anything that transpires speak for itself, instead choosing to hammer everything home with an unsubtle ferocity that's obnoxious. The Junkie XL (Divergent) score is omnipresent, smothering emotions to the point they are relegated to bewildering irrelevancy.

One wonders what might have happened if an aging master like Michael Mann (Heat), William Friedkin (The French Connection) or even Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather trilogy) had been given the reins or ponder how an emerging talent like J.C. Chandor (A Most Violent Year), Scott Cooper (Out of the Furnace) or David Lowery (Ain't Them Bodies Saints) might have chosen to stage things. This is a movie that required observational restraint along the lines of what legendary auteur Sidney Lumet was known for, Run All Night existing in the same sort of Prince of the City meets Q&A moral grey areas those classics excelled at enveloping the viewer within.

Collett-Serra doesn't seem to have the first clue as to how to achieve that sort of effect. While the various chase sequences and action scenes are suitably intense, they're so flashy and cryptically edited, following along as to what is happening is oftentimes impossible. Heck, one escape is positively magical, Jimmy and Mike disappearing from a cement room with only one door surrounded by police almost as if both were Houdini wriggling out of a straightjacket. One second they're trapped, the next they're standing outside on a bridge safe from capture, no scene in-between the two included to explain how this miraculous achievement has come to pass.

As annoying as this is, it might be moderately forgivable had the director shown even a modicum of restraint during the dramatic sequences. This is not to be, however, Collett-Serra depicting conversations between adversaries, friends and family alike in the same sort of frenetic, heavy-handed fashion as he does the various shoot-outs and fist fights. While the actors do what they can - Harris, Neeson and Kinnaman particularly so - they're all smothered by the self-indulgent bluster infused into every scene by the filmmaker, the fact any of them are able to emotionally resonate even a microscopic amount is something of a minor miracle.

Less would have been more as it pertains to Run All Night. While Ingelsby's scenario is hardly original, it's still strong enough that it's easy to imagine the psychologically rewarding opus that might have been. But Collett-Serra directs as if he's making a Non-Stop sequel and not a hard-boiled gangster melodrama where emotions run as cold as the frozen rain pelting the city's windswept winter streets. It insults the intelligence of the viewer, while also leaving its talented cast out to dry, struggling to give audiences a reason to care, the picture nothing more than a forgettable, almost shameful failure that will undoubtedly rank as one of 2015's most frustrating disappointments.


Gleefully gruesome Wyrmwood a full-throttle treat
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

WYRMWOOD:
ROAD OF THE DEAD
VOD/OnDemand


A comet streaks across the sky. Mechanic Barry (Jay Gallagher) and his family find it beautiful, but as far as the grand scheme is concerned they don't think all that much about it and quickly turn in for the night. But sleep doesn't come easily, especially when a rabid neighbor invades their home looking more dead than alive. Turns out, a horrific plague is sweeping across all of Australia, and while some are immune, the majority find themselves transformed into flesh-eating zombies ready to disembowel all they encounter.

Things quickly go from bad to worse, Barry cut off from all he loves deciding to set out on a seemingly hopeless mission to find his missing sister Brooke (Bianca Bradey) who he refuses to believe is dead. And he's right, too, even if he doesn't know it, the headstrong young woman immune from the zombie virus; and because of that she's been kidnapped by a group of paramilitary thugs lead by a crazed Doctor (Berynn Schwerdt) who knows more about what's going on than he chooses to say.

I get it. Zombie movies are a dime a dozen, and even as a self-proclaimed horror genre junkie, I can't say I get all that excited about seeing new ones all that often anymore. Once upon a time you could make a bad zombie flick and still get some relatively jovial, suitably stomach-churning mileage out of them. But thanks to shows like 'The Walking Dead,' VOD, the SyFy Channel and countless other avenues for release, the well has ostensibly begun to run dry, and while the genre can still offer a few moderate amusements, it takes a monumental effort indeed to get me to stand up and take notice in this day and age.

Thankfully, the Aussie import Wyrmwood: Road of the Dead is just that sort of effort, the film a giddy, go-for-broke, apocalyptic assault on the senses that plays like it's the happily exuberant love child of Georges Miller (Mad Max) and Romero (Night of the Living Dead). Suitably silly, undeniably gory, the picture is still an imaginative take on the genre that offers up notable idiosyncrasies and ideas that just get better and better as things go along. Director Kiah Roache-Turner delivers a startlingly entertaining debut, he and his brother Tristan composing a script that's as ingenious as it is flat-out cool.

I think what I adore most about the film is that it actually doesn't just fall in love with the warped stuff, doesn't just wallow in the expertly delivered blood and guts. Instead, Kiah and Tristan go out of their way to give Barry layers, allowing him to be a well rounded, suitably grounded everyman trying his best to navigate the most impossible of situations. There's an emotionally crushing sequence featuring him and his family along the side of the road after their car has mysteriously stopped, while a growing friendship between him and wandering aborigine Benny (a terrific Leon Burchill) is authentically complex.

Yet this is still a cartoon, a glorious, high-octane whirligig of souped-up automobiles and rampaging undead hordes that's so much fun there should probably be a law against such things. The brothers pay homage to the genre while at the same time coming up with ideas and concepts uniquely their own, the way they solve a sudden, unexplained petrol shortage nothing less than virtuosic. Kiah stages some remarkable action sequences and does so on what had to have been a relatively miniscule budget, blatantly stealing from pictures as disparate as The Road Warrior, Supercop: Police Story 3, the Fast and the Furious franchise and even Resident Evil. Yet he makes these lifts feel uniquely his own, adding his own distinctive twist every single supercharged step of the way.

At the center of the chaos is Gallagher; and like Mel Gibson and Russell Crowe before him, this Australian actor has the makings of an international superstar. He's magnetic, oozing a form of carnal, all-powerful masculinity that's intoxicating. Same time, he's not afraid of displaying emotion, allowing the viewer to see inside Barry's soul, giving the film added dimensions and depths that can't help but make it all the more invigorating and appealing in the process. While I'd never say he's guaranteed to rise to the same heights as those Braveheart and A Beautiful Mind Oscar-winners, I do think he's got it in him to do so; here's my vote hoping he does it.

Wyrmwood doesn't reinvent the wheel. It doesn't shake up the zombie genre so much that it will never be the same afterwards. Yet it's filled to the brim with indelible moments that joyfully take up space in the memory, showcasing sequences of ingenuity and wit that had me rocking back and forth in my seat in total, unrestrained euphoria. Director Kiah Roache-Turner is the real deal, the man a talented newcomer I can't help but expect great things from, his debut one of the most gruesomely pleasurable ones I've come across in quite some time.


Ambitious Chappie a robotic misfire
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

CHAPPIE
Now playing


It is 2016, and in the South African city of Johannesburg crime is out of control. But thanks to genius Tetravaal Corp robotics engineer Deon Wilson (Dev Patel) things are about to change. He's personally spearheaded the design and creation of a robot police force that will revolutionize law enforcement, pleasing CEO Michelle Bradley (Sigourney Weaver) while also sending the stock price of his company through the proverbial roof.

Yet Deon isn't content. He wants to take things to the next level and transform robotic consciousness and human understanding of artificial intelligence forever, and as such he's written a new program he thinks will do just that. But before he can upload his ideas into a battered police unit destined for demolition the scientist is kidnapped by a small group of criminals led by the cartoonish Ninja and his daffy blonde girlfriend Yolandi (real life South African rap stars NINJA and ¥O-LANDI VI$$ER). They force him to use his skills immediately, no time to test, no opportunity to plan, in hopes Deon can create a robot that will help them accomplish the biggest payroll heist Johannesburg has ever seen.

Thus is born Chappie, portrayed and voiced by actor Sharlto Copley with a team of visual effects and motion capture wizards responsible for his photorealistic final look. As a character, he's incredible, director and co-writer Neill Blomkamp and fellow screenwriter Terri Tatchell - reteaming for the first time since District 9 - making him an enigmatic and deeply fascinating newborn evolving with convincing complexity. Something of a combination of Johnny 5, HAL 900 and Robocop, Chappie lives in ways that are astounding, making him one of the more fascinating characters likely to hit theatre screens in all of 2015.

But as a movie, as a finished motion picture, Chappie itself is a wildly anachronistic muddled mess. It's unfocused and undisciplined. More than that, it treats its main characters with bizarre, close to callous cruelty, painting its most intelligent inhabitants as if their only goal in life was to be the biggest idiot in all of South Africa. People do things for reasons that confound and irritate, Deon especially, so developing a human connection to almost anything taking place becomes a virtual impossibility.

The biggest and most egregious offender is fellow Tetravaal engineer Vincent Moore (Hugh Jackman). A former military man, he is disgusted by the very concept of artificial intelligence, which in and of itself would be okay, but neither Blomkamp nor Tatchell seem to know what to make of him. More than that, they're so obsessed with cementing him as the dastardly sociopathic villain, they do a poor job of making his plan make a lick of sense. He's an egotistical monster right from the start, and it's only thanks to Jackman's inherent star power and charisma that any sense of multidimensionality is attained, Vincent nothing more than a rote, incredibly forgettable thug who seems to take great joy in gunning down those he sees as criminals more than he does anything else.

Yet it doesn't stop there. The idea is simple enough, the filmmakers setting up a scenario where the newly sentient life form is forced to decide between his maker, Deon, Yolandi (whom he decides to call 'Mommy') or Ninja, all of them setting themselves up as teachers and erstwhile parents vying to set the robot on his evolutionary path. But this discussion never takes shape, everything so mishandled it doesn't matter near as much as it should if Chappie comes to understand what is right or what is wrong, while attempting to navigate the grey areas lying in-between. This moral quagmire is frustrating in its disheveled malevolence, the ideas being explored so fractured and incomplete they're almost indecipherable.

On a technical front, however, Chappie is remarkable. This isn't a Short Circuit meets Robocop meets District 9 clone; and while thematically similarities are readily apparent, from a visual and production standpoint Blomkamp has managed to create a world unique in and of itself. As already stated, the central character himself is astonishing - moving, evolving and reacting in ways that astound. More, there is a refreshing, almost sensual allure to Trent Opaloch's (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) cinematography I was drawn to, while Jules Cook's suitably dingy, impeccably lived-in production design captures the spirit of what the director is aiming for to perfection.

I appreciate Blomkamp's ambition. Between this, District 9 and Elysium he's certainly interested in being a sci-fi filmmaker who wants to be known for tackling big ideas and complex themes. Problem is, while his first film got most of what he wanted to right, his two follow-ups have been far less successful, each not knowing what to do with themselves once they've presented their initial world-in-dystopian-crisis scenarios. Chappie shows great promise, it just maddeningly refuses to live up to it, its final moments as robotic and as poorly engineered as a malfunctioning Furby ready for the scrapheap.


Salvation a powerfully austere Western
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE SALVATION
Now playing


Reunited with his wife and son after eons apart setting up a new home in the middle of the American frontier, Danish immigrant Jon (Mads Mikkelsen) is left a ragged shell after a crushing tragedy befalls his family on the trip to his and his brother Peter's (Mikael Persbrandt) farm. Revenging himself against those who wronged him, the former soldier now finds himself the target of Delarue (Jeffrey Dean Morgan), a notorious cutthroat who lords over the local township as if it were his own personal fiefdom.

The locals, urged on in no small part by the curiously calm Keane (Jonathan Pryce), a town elder and moneyman who holds an inordinate amount of power for a person of his position, have decided to turn their back on Jon, refusing to help him or his brother in their fight against Delarue. Only the mute - if still beautiful - Madeline (Eve Green), the gang leader's hardened financial guru, seems up to the challenge, the woman secretly maintaining an old grudge that she's only now ready to act upon.

There is little that could be called different or new about Danish director and co-writer Kristian Levring's (Fear Me Not) austere Western The Salvation. It's a revenge-fueled saga into the dusty plains, the sagebrush caked in blood and the floorboards littered with bits of flesh left after the fires have burned the buildings to ash and the revolvers have run out of bullets to fire. Jon's story could very well have been told by the likes of John Ford, Howard Hawks, Sergio Leone, John Sturges, Clint Eastwood or Kevin Costner, the mechanics of his narrative as comfortably familiar as a broken-in leather saddle sitting atop a gracefully aging stallion.

The outright unabashed familiarity of Levring and Anders Thomas Jensen's (Love Is All You Need) script is a problem, lessening the dramatic impact of much that occurs because of this. I knew early on exactly what it was Jon was going to do and what the road would be to get him there, the only questions just how exactly the final confrontation between him and Delarue would be staged and little else. While the characters, namely Madeline, have their respective secrets, the movie itself holds very few of its own, and as such my emotional investment in the outcome wasn't strong.

Yet I liked The Salvation. Heck, I maybe even loved it. Mikkelsen - a terrific actor in everything from television's 'Hannibal,' to the James Bond adventure Casino Royale, to the outstanding period epic A Royal Affair, to what should have been an Oscar-nominated performance in The Hunt - is superb, bringing a level of pain and pathos to Jon that is all-encompassing. He gives the movie its charge, and while his intentions are never in doubt, how he gets to where he is going is consistently fascinating, all thanks to his dynamic, fearlessly stubborn performance.

Green is also excellent, bringing a level of majesty to her portrait of a woman scorned, quietly looking for the right moment to enact her revenge even though she doesn't utter a single word. She proves once again to be one of the more underrated, intriguingly multifaceted character actresses working today. In many respects I'd have been hugely curious to see what a story entirely about Madeline's journey and what it was that brought her to Delarue's doorstep might have theoretically looked like, part of me a little sad this wasn't the picture Levring set out to make.

Additionally, the filmmaker does a consummate job bringing things to life visually, paying deft homage to the masters of the genre while at the same time crafting his own signature esthetic that's inhumanely, even vulgarly authentic. Jens Schlosser's (Deliver Us from Evil) seedily dexterous cinematography is adroitly juxtaposed against Jørgen Munk's devilishly effective production design, Kasper Winding's (The Riot Club) ethereally refined score adding just the right touch allowing things to hit home with a ferocity they otherwise likely wouldn't have.

It's likely impossible to make a case that The Salvation goes anyplace Western aficionados have not seen before. Whether Wayne or Eastwood, Cooper or Costner, the footsteps Mikkelsen's Jon are treading in aren't exactly fresh. At the same time, Levring's affection for the genre is apparent, while his handling of the tale's central moments pack a powerful punch that knocked me upside the head leaving me just to the right side of awestruck. This is a fine film indeed, one I'll happily ride along with again with no hesitation whatsoever.


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New Century Theatre Company's The Flick a meticulously produced and very entertaining evening
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Northwest News
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Distribute funds to the HIV+ people who need it
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Disney's new Cinderella a 'Bibbity Bobbity' beauty
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Heavy-handed Run a melodramatic insult
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Gleefully gruesome Wyrmwood a full-throttle treat
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Ambitious Chappie a robotic misfire
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