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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, April 29, 2016 - Volume 44 Issue 18
Seattle supports a national park for Stonewall
Section One
ALL STORIES
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Seattle supports a national park for Stonewall

by Shaun Knittel - SGN Associate Editor

Despite the rich history and cultural impact the LGBT community has made in the United States, there does not yet exist a national LGBTQ park that recognizes that. The National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) is doing all it can to change that, and Seattle - from its many LGBTQ and Allied organizations to the City Council and Mayor's office - is showing support in a big way.

On April 25, the Seattle City Council passed with unanimous consent a resolution expressing the City of Seattle's fervent support for the designation of a National Park for Stonewall, in New York City. The resolution supports the nationwide campaign to designate the first national park site to honor LGBTQ civil rights and equality.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is scheduled to sign Resolution 31660 during a ceremony April 29, at 2 p.m., in the Norman B. Rice room at City Hall.

'The struggle for LGBTQ civil rights is a crucial part of our national history, and germane to Seattle's community culture,' said Councilmember Lorena González (Position 9 - Citywide). 'My role as chair of the Safe Communities committee is inspired by the work of civil rights pioneers in our city, which includes (but isn't limited to) members of the LGBT Commission, Equal Rights Washington, the Pride Foundation, GSBA and many others who also work on issues which support safety and tolerance in Seattle.'

'Our city has long been a leader on local civil rights issues with national significance,' she said. 'Today, Seattle invites other municipalities to follow our lead once again and express support for memorialization of the struggle for LGBTQ civil rights nationwide.'

Rob Smith, Northwest Director for National Parks Conservation Association, said, 'National Parks Conservation Association commends the Seattle City Council for passing a resolution today in support of designating a National Park for Stonewall.'

'Some places are so strongly associated with a historical event that their name alone triggers their story. Independence Hall. Selma. Little Rock High School. Seneca Falls. Minidoka, including the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial,' he said. 'Stonewall is one of those places, but unlike those others, Stonewall is not yet recognized in the National Park System.'

'A National Park for Stonewall would begin to close a gap of our National Park System as the first national park site to honor LGBT equality and the long fight that many have waged for civil rights,' said Smith. 'Today, Seattle adds its voice to demonstrate support from coast to coast for this national park proposal.'

'We must continue to protect and preserve these places, urban and rural, natural and historic, that speak to and represent who we are as a nation,' concluded Smith.

Additionally, The National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) hosted a speaker series event: 'Telling America's Story, Creating Equality in the National Park System,' April 26, from 7-8:30 p.m., inside the Campion Ballroom located in Campion Tower at Seattle University (914 E. Jefferson Street).

NPCA teamed up with renowned African American Lesbian feminist, Boston Public Radio's 'All Revved Up' commentator and syndicated columnist Rev. Irene Monroe to convene the discussion about a need to celebrate and recognize the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in the national park system.

Rev. Monroe shared her Stonewall story to give voice to the riots that inspired LGBT communities throughout the country to organize in support of their civil rights.

The following is from an essay that appears in a new collection of LGBT writings about New York City, Love, Christopher Street: Reflections of New York City, edited by Thomas Keith, with an introduction by Christopher Bram, and published by Vantage Point Books. The names in the story has been changed to protect identities:

Dis-membering Stonewall - By Rev. Irene Monroe

Friday, June 27th, was the last day of school that year. And with school out, my middle-school cronies and I looked forward to a summer reprieve from rioting against Italian, Irish and Jewish public school kids for being bussed into their neighborhoods. However, the summer months in Brooklyn's African American enclaves only escalated rioting between New York's finest-the New York Police Department-and us. During this tumultuous decade of Black rage and white police raids, knee-jerk responses to each other's slights easily set the stage for a conflagration, creating both instantaneous and momentary fighting alliances in these Black communities-across gangs, class, age, ethnicity and sexual orientations-against police brutality.

That night of June 27th started out no differently than any hot and humid summer Friday night in my neighborhood. Past midnight, folks with no AC or working fans in their homes were just hanging out. Some lounged on the fire escapes while others were on the stoops of their brownstones laughing and shooting the breeze. Some were in heated discussion of Black revolutionary politics, while the Holy Rollers were competing with each other over Scripture. The Jenkins boys were drumming softly on their congas to the hot breezy mood of the night air. And directly under the street lamp was an old beat-up folding card table where the Fletchers and the Andersons, lifelong friends and neighbors, were shouting over a game of bid whist.

The sight of Dupree galloping up the block toward us abruptly interrupted the calm of the first hour of Saturday, June 28th. Dupree stopped in front of the gaming table and yelled out, 'The pigs across the bridge are beating up on Black fa**ots-right now!' Cissy Anderson, who was just moments from throwing in her hand to go to bed, let out a bloodcurdling scream that shook us and brought a momentary halt to everything. Nate Anderson grabbed his wife to comfort her and said, 'Cissy, calm down.'

Greenwich Village in the 1800s had housed the largest population for former slaves in the country. But gentrification forced racial relocation and led to Harlem becoming the Mecca of Black America. When Dupree stopped in front of Mr. Fletcher's game table, he was signaling to his aunt and uncle that their son Birdie, who sang like a beautiful songbird, was more than likely in the melee across the bridge. Everyone knew Birdie was gay, and we wondered where he and his 'brother-girls,' as he dubbed them, had gone on the weekends when they laughed and spoke in code on Sundays about their exploits while robing-up for choir.

Cissy detested that her eldest, Nate Turner 'Birdie' Anderson, Jr., went outside the community to a white neighborhood to be himself. Nate, Sr., too, worried about his eldest son. When Birdie told his dad he was gay, his father asked him if he understood that he didn't know how to keep him safe, especially if his son wandered out of his purview. When his voice rose above Dupree's and the crowd, we were as shocked to silence as we were by Cissy's bloodcurdling scream. 'My son is somewhere there and I need you all to help me find him and bring him home safely to his mother and me.'

Coming out of the subway station at Christopher Street we could hear the commotion. The shoving and pushing by both protestors and police yanked three of us away from the core group; we were left to fend for ourselves.

As the momentum of the crowd pushed my small group to Waverly Place, a block away from the Stonewall, we witnessed two white cops pummeling a Black drag queen. 'I should shove this stick up your ass,' said one of the cops as he pulled up her dress with a nightstick in his hand. The taller of the two cops yanked off her wig and laughingly tossed it to the other cop. In spotting us, the cop who caught the wig threw it at us yelling, 'You ni**er fa*s get away!' The wig missed and landed about a foot away from us, but the cop's words hit, striking fear.

When I look back at the first night of the Stonewall Inn riots, I could have never imagined its future importance. The first night played out no differently from previous riots with Black Americans and white policemen. And so, too, it being underreported. But I was there.

On the first night of the Stonewall Inn riots, African Americans and Latinos were the largest percentage of the protestors because we heavily frequented the bar. For Black and Latino homeless youth and young adults, who slept in nearby Christopher Park, the Stonewall Inn was their stable domicile. The Stonewall Inn being raided was nothing new. In the 1960s gay bars in the Village were routinely raided, but, 'Race is said to have been another factor. The decision by the police to raid the bar in the manner they did may have been influenced by the fact that most of the 'homosexuals' they would encounter were of color, and therefore even more objectionable.'

The Stonewall Riot of June 27-29, 1969 in Greenwich Village started on the backs of working class African American and Latino queers who patronized that bar. Those brown and Black LGBTQ people are not only absent from the photos of that night, but have been bleached from its written history. Many LGBTQ Blacks and Latinos argue that one of the reasons for the gulf between whites and themselves is about how the dominant queer community rewrote and continues to control the narrative of Stonewall.


At the April 26 event, NPCA, along with Seattle entertainer The Lady B, Pride Foundation Executive Director Kris Hermanns, NPCA's Graham Taylor, and many partner organizations, echoed the call for a national park at Stonewall. Community members had the opportunity to participate in a Q&A session designed for a broader community discussion that included multiple perspectives.

The event was made possible by Ellen Ferguson, Seattle University, Carter Subaru, Pride Foundation, Greater Seattle Business Association (GSBA), Entre Hermanos, Out for Sustainability, The Wildrose Tavern, Equal Rights Washington and Re-bar.

Learn more at: www.npca.org/natlparkforstonewall. Join the conversation online with #NatlParkForStonewall.

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