Friday, Dec 06, 2019
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 42 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, September 2, 2016 - Volume 44 Issue 36
Lack of HIV testing undermines global fight against disease, WHO says
Section One
ALL STORIES
  next story
Lack of HIV testing undermines global fight against disease, WHO says

by Mike Andrew - SGN Staff Writer

Shortfalls in HIV testing - especially in the global south - could undermine efforts to fight the disease, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned in a new report.

The United Nation targets for HIV diagnosis and treatment could be missed as a result, the group said.

UN targets for 2020 say that 90% of all people living with HIV should know their HIV status, 90% of those diagnosed should receive antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 90% of these treated patients should have 'durable viral suppression,' which is a measure of effective treatment.

Laboratory testing is vital to meet and monitor these aims, the WHO pointed out, but a new survey published in the journal PLoS Medicine suggests that many countries will fall short of the goals.

WHO staffer Dr. Vincent Habiyambere and his fellow researchers found that some low- and middle-income countries, including African countries where the incidence of HIV infection is high, are not yet geared up for the challenge.

Habiyambere and his research team looked at responses to annual surveys the WHO sent out to 127 countries between 2012 and 2014 asking about their HIV testing capacity and their use of the blood tests that check HIV status and health.

For the study, surveys were sent to:

o all 47 countries in the WHO African Region,

o 33 countries in the WHO Region of the Americas,

o all 21 countries in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region,

o eight high-burden HIV countries in the WHO European Region,

o all 11 countries in the WHO South-East Asia Region, and

o seven high-burden HIV countries in the WHO Western Pacific Region.

Over the three survey years, 55 countries responded to all three surveys (or 43% of the total), 35 (28% of the total) responded to two surveys, 25 (20%) to one survey, and nine (7%) responded to none of the three surveys.

WHO researchers found that testing access did improve over the years, but shortfalls remained in some parts of the world.

Reasons cited for the gaps in testing included lack of the chemical reagents that identify HIV antibodies, testing equipment not being installed or maintained properly, and inadequate or nonexistent staff training.

In some laboratories, researchers discovered, machines were not serviced regularly. In others, machines broke down and were not covered by contracts to be serviced or fixed.

'A national laboratory strategic plan to strengthen services must be developed, implemented, and monitored by governments and their national and international partners,' Habiyambere said.

'The focus of the international community, to ensure optimal use of laboratory technologies, should be on those countries where interventions for scaling up access to HIV diagnostic technologies are most needed.'

In an editorial accompanying WHO's research report, HIV experts Peter Kilmarx and Raiva Simbi said the findings show that some anti-HIV programs may have been 'overly focused' on buying equipment without planning for how it would be used and maintained.

In Zimbabwe, for example, only 5.6% of HIV patients on drug treatment in 2015 received regular blood checks to monitor their viral load - far fewer than the goal of 21%.

This result was largely because of problems with resource allocation, specimen transport, and equipment procurement, they said.

'Strong leadership, resources, planning, and management are needed to scale up laboratory services,' Kilmarx and Raiva concluded.

Tell a friend:

Share on Facebook  Share on Facebook

Post to MySpace!Share on MySpace!

    Share on Delicious

Share on StumbleUpon!

New York court makes landmark ruling on rights of non-biological and non-adoptive parents
------------------------------
Federal judge bars North Carolina from enforcing 'bathroom bill':

Cites Title IX sex discrimination language

------------------------------
Lack of HIV testing undermines global fight against disease, WHO says
------------------------------
Marine veteran hero of nightclub shooting to be honored at gala in San Diego
------------------------------
California adopts youth suicide prevention plan
------------------------------
Racists loved Trump immigration speech,

Latino Republicans head for the exits

------------------------------
Trump campaign: A nest of bigots
------------------------------
Families celebrate Justice Mary Yu
------------------------------
Labor Day special feature: List of union-made beers
------------------------------
Man who made threats against LGBTQ community under intense scrutiny in FL
------------------------------
Don't be wowed -
Little details to look for in a potential home

------------------------------
Retired Irish president says Catholic Church should accept Gay priests
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
BREAKING NEWS
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2016 - DigitalTeamWorks 2016

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News