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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, January 13, 2017 - Volume 45 Issue 02
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Scorsese's Silence a grueling exploration of suffering, sacrifice and grace
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

SILENCE
Now playing


After learning that their beloved teacher and mentor Father Christovão Ferreira (Liam Neeson) may have apostatized himself - disavowed his belief in the Holy Catholic Church - while doing missionary work in Japan, Father Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield) and Father Garupe (Adam Driver) beg their superior Father Valignano (Ciarán Hinds) for permission to travel from their home in Portugal to the secretive Asian country to investigate the matter. It is 1633 and the ruling Japanese Tokugawa Shogunate has outlawed Christianity thus forcing converts underground, utilizing all manner of abhorrent methods to stamp out the religion. Rodrigues and Garupe are undaunted, determined to make the perilous journey and minister to the people who share their faith, believing they will discover the truth about their beloved Father Ferreira if they are willing to journey into the unknown.

Thanks to the help of drunken expatriate Kichijiro (Yôsuke Kubozuka), whom they meet in China, the Fathers are welcomed into a small coastal village with open arms, elders Ichizo (Yoshi Oida) and Mokichi (Shin'ya Tsukamoto) pressing the pair into service with a warm smile and a selflessly loving embrace. But the Grand Inquisitor Inoue (Issei Ogata) will not be stopped, and he's become very good at ferreting out Christians, his vengeful wrath oftentimes delivered with a knowing smile and grandfatherly wink. Rodrigues and Garupe, worried for the safety of those they are supposed to be ministering to, decide to part company and go their separate ways, thinking it would be best if they move through the country alone, hopeful that by doing so they'll touch more lives as well as find Father Ferreira faster.

Martin Scorsese has wanted to adapt Shûsaku Endô's 1966 Silence for almost three decades. A labor of love, the film certainly fits perfectly alongside both of the director's previous religious epics, 1988's The Last Temptation of Christ and 1997's Kundun, this nuanced, meticulously realized saga of two 17th century Portuguese missionaries lost in a strange land as uncomfortably unforgettable as it is cryptically compelling. This isn't a movie for the faint of heart, the struggles of not just this pair of devout men but also those who follow them a complicated sojourn of faith, suffering, forgiveness, sacrifice and grace that left me bruised, battered and stunned by the time it ended.

But how to make sense of it all? As far as that question is concerned, honestly I don't have an answer. There is a war raging within Scorsese and fellow writer Jay Cocks' (Gangs of New York) complex, character-driven screenplay, the battle for Rodrigues' soul as hard fought and as devastatingly brutal as anything that can be imagined. What it is all about, the themes they are playing with, none of it is clear, which apparently is exactly as the duo wants it all to be, the religious discussions roiling through the proceedings a razor sharp samurai sword of violence and compassion that's as likely to be placed within its sheath as it is to slice an unsuspecting believer's head clean from their neck.

It's difficult to watch, and not just because of the bloodletting and the violence. No, as extreme as all that is, the carnage also fits in with the nature of the story with haunting ease, and as such the savage nature of what is depicted is never as repugnant as it likely would have been in a lesser filmmaker's hands. It's the formality of the piece that makes it so prickly, Scorsese presenting a world of such rigid structure and social hierarchies the quiet menace sinks in all the deeper because of it. The filmmaker is channeling Japanese masters like Yasujirô Ozu or Masaki Kobayashi, the construction and tone just as important as the underlying emotional nuances that push each character forward along their respective paths.

It also reminded me a great deal of Scorsese and Cocks' first pairing, the superb The Age of Innocence, that cold, bleakly austere 1993 rendering of Edith Wharton's classic novel every bit as measured as this new opus. Much like that masterpiece, the director refuses to play by the rules, flouting genre conventions whenever and wherever he can. Silence rushes slowly towards its astonishing conclusion, the fires of conscience and sacrifice revealing new, perplexing truths that put all that had come before into brand new perspective.

Garfield, so spectacular just a couple of months ago as the brave heroic pacifist Desmond Doss in Mel Gibson's Hacksaw Ridge, is excellent, giving as much of himself as he can in order to make sure Father Rodrigues' inner tumult and struggles register. Driver is also superb, virtually unrecognizable as Father Garupe, his face oftentimes contorted in a marsupial-like manner that slowly led me to believe his journey was one of intelligent everyman transforming into a selfless sacrificial beast than it was virtually anything else.

It is the Japanese actors, however, who make the most indelible imprints. Tsukamoto, a renowned director in his own right, known for classics like Tetsuo, the Iron Man and Nightmare Detective, is agonizingly marvelous, his final moments aching with a full-bodied tenor that brought tears to my eyes. Equally amazing is Oida, his tender embrace of the two Father's after they first come to his village magnificent. As for Kubozuka, in many ways his Kichijiro is the Judas Iscariot of the piece, and watching this wretch return time and time again pleading for forgiveness for mistakes made and wrongs wrought shattered my heart into a million little pieces when all was said and done.

But all of them pale when stood alongside Ogata's genius as the inquisitor Inoue. Playful. Murderous. Conniving. Understanding. Ruthless. Forgiving. He weaves all of the man's varying shades into a colorful cloth of mirth and menace that is unnervingly fascinating. Ogata is the grey all the story's blacks and whites meld into by the time the winds of change swirl into their quiet hurricane, the actor orchestrating the mournful symphony playing in the background with cagey resolve. He's smarter than everyone else, manipulating others to do his bidding with easygoing precision, his reasons for attempting to stomp out Christianity before it can plant its seeds not nearly as simple or as obvious as might initially be believed.

The film itself is constructed with Scorsese's typical attention to detail, cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto (The Wolf of Wall Street), production designer Dante Ferretti (Hugo, The Aviator) and legendary editor Thelma Schoonmaker (The Departed, Raging Bull) all rising to the occasion. It should also be noted that the film's sound design is flat-out incredible, the immersive structure of the sonic landscape the director has had composed giving things a devastatingly eerie quality that kept me off-balance for all of the film's 161 minutes.

Even so, it's impossible for me to explain exactly how I felt walking out of the theatre once Scorsese's latest came to an end. I think his adaptation of Endô's book has more to do with grace than it does suffering, that it asks the viewer to forgive the trespasses of others more than it wants them to revel in the pain being inflicted upon even the most devoted and pious of the true believers. But I honestly cannot say for certain, and as such, Silence is a troubling, emotion-fueled enigma, and only through additional viewings do I believe an understanding of what it is Scorsese is attempting to say will ever be determined.


Latest Underworld is goofy bloody fun
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

UNDERWORLD: BLOOD WARS
Now playing


If you'd have told me 2003's Vampires vs. Lycans (i.e. werewolves) adventure Underworld would go on to spawn four sequels and gift star Kate Beckinsale an iconic action heroine in the form of the bloodthirsty Selene, I'd have thought you were insane. While I enjoyed the film, I'd never have imagined the series would continue as it has, the ongoing popularity mildly perplexing.

Not that I mind. I actually like these movies, especially the second one, 2006's Underworld: Evolution, its unabashed absurd gruesomeness and pugnacious creativity as far as the action scenes were concerned particularly satisfying. Things took a slight step back with 2009's Selene-less prequel Underworld: Rise of the Lycans, but 2012's Underworld: Awakening worked pretty well, Beckinsale once again back kicking human and werewolf butt, even if her co-star and love interest from the first two films, Scott Speedman, was nowhere to be found. All-in-all, as silly as they might be, I can watch any of these moonlit supernatural thrillers without reservation; and while I'd never claim any are excellent, the fact I enjoy them for what they are is perfectly satisfactory in my book.

Building off the events of Awakening, Underworld: Blood Wars finds Selene on the run from vampires and lycans alike. The former look at her as a traitor, willing to kill the elders of her clan in order to protect her hybrid lover Michael as well as the spawn of their union, beloved daughter Eve. The latter want the blood of that now teenage girl, believing her mother, despite protestations to the contrary, know where Eve's hiding and thus will do whatever it takes to get that information out of her head. (Speedman, still apparently declining to return to the franchise, only appears here via flashbacks.)

While their primary task is the hunting of Selene, the lycans, led by a new, strangely powerful leader named Marius (Tobias Menzies), have also done a remarkable job wiping out a number of the vampire strongholds. With that being the case, the elders of the remaining clans, thanks in large part to the urging of the trusted Thomas (Charles Dance), make the uneasy decision to rethink a number of their current positions. That includes their dealings with Selene, sending word to the former Death Dealer that they'd like her back at their eastern fortress, eager for her to train a new generation of fighters in this seemingly never-ending war against the lycans.

There's a big double-cross, which shouldn't come as any sort of surprise for those who have stuck with Underworld from the beginning. There's also a gigantic reveal involving David (Theo James), Selene's only apparent ally, Thomas' son introduced in Awakening. Most importantly, there's a glorious new female vampire played by 'MI-5,' 'True Blood' and 'Da Vinci's Demons' star Lara Pulver who is kind of terrific, the depth and breadth of her bloodcurdling duplicity befitting of a larger-than-life cartoon villainess this series has needed since the beginning. Finally, we even get to go full 'Game of Thrones' and discover an entirely new vampire enclave of white-haired Nordic warriors with mystical powers, all of them ready to divulge ancient secrets involving both Selene and David.

What's amazing is that somehow, someway director Anna Foerster, cinematographer on White House Down and Anonymous making her feature debut, and screenwriter Cory Goodman (The Last Witch Hunter, Priest) stuff all of this nonsense inside an efficient 91 minutes. And, like a rather solid second tier comic book, it works, the filmmakers delivering all this exposition in the blink of an eye while still managing to stage a trio of solid action set pieces I found happily satisfying. Unsurprisingly, Foerster has a keen eye, staging things in a way that allows the carnage to always be easy to follow no matter how convoluted things might become. She keeps the focus right where it needs to be, the director and her editor Peter Amundson (Pacific Rim) never overcutting things into an unintelligible mishmash, producing a consistent sense of adrenaline that's admirably impressive.

It's still Underworld, and it all continues to be as silly as ever. Things do play, as they did in Awakening, a little too much like episodic television, all of it often having the feel of a bigger budgeted CW television series that's building up for the finale than it does a standalone motion picture. More, if fans are expecting a key character from the first two films to suddenly return if there is indeed a climactic installment, they might want to check those expectation at the box office as it ain't gonna happen based on the information callously delivered here.

Nonetheless, I got a kick out of Underworld: Blood Wars. It's a step up from the last entry in a lot of major ways, Foerster showcasing solid directorial chops that helps give this fifth chapter an added infusion of energy and excitement I wasn't anticipating. As ludicrous and as thin as all this might remain, I still find Underworld to be a fun series, one that Beckinsale anchors with more gravitas and enthusiasm than it perhaps deserves. If there is a final chapter, I'll be there to see it opening night, happily paying for a ticket alongside other fans eager to see how Selene's story comes to its end.


Compelling Patriots Day is Boston strong
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

PATRIOTS DAY
Now playing


It's Patriots Day, and Boston Detective Tommy Saunders (Mark Wahlberg), to get back in the good graces of his superiors, is patrolling the finish line of the Boston Marathon, keeping an eye on all of the V.I.P.s while also making sure all of his fellow officers are doing their assigned jobs. Things are going well, spirits are high and everyone is having a terrific time.

Without warning, an explosion rocks the finish line. Before anyone knows what is happening, another bomb goes off, and in the span of seconds Boston has been attacked, Tommy, his fellow officers, helpful bystanders and individuals running the race springing into action to assist all of those injured, bloodied and brutalized in this act of senseless violence.

In no time at all Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick (Michael Beach) and Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis (John Goodman) are on the scene, as are the FBI led by Special Agent Richard DesLauriers (Kevin Bacon), the latter taking charge of the situation once the bombing is ruled an act of terrorism. Over the next 100-plus hours, Tommy finds himself involved in one of the largest manhunts in American history, all of them searching for a pair of bombers, brothers Dzhokhar (Alex Wolff) and Tamerlan Tsarnaev (Themo Melikidze), two young men who have deluded themselves into believing they're actually going to get away with their cowardly crimes.

Director Peter Berg's Patriots Day is a procedural that recounts the horrific April 15, 2013 events that took place during that year's Boston Marathon as well as the hunt for the Tsarnaev brothers that transpired over the ensuing four days. Much like his last two collaborations with Wahlberg, Lone Survivor and Deepwater Horizon, the film is a fact-based thriller that tries to stay as close to actual events as it can even as it infuses its story with bits of fiction in order to augment its emotional dynamics. Exceedingly well made and cast, this film is consistently fascinating, building in resonance and power as things move along to their well-documented conclusion.

There's a lot to love, not the least of which is the depiction of the bombing, Berg refusing to engage in cheap theatrics or sensationalism, allowing the inherent acts of selfless heroism of those on the scene to speak for themselves. There's also a spectacular bit of recreation where DesLauriers' team discovers video footage of Dzhokhar and then brings in Tommy to help them backtrack the bomber's steps, each piece of detective work leading them another step closer to bringing the brothers to justice. I also liked a climactic sequence where Watertown Sgt. Jeffrey Pugliese (J.K. Simmons) goes above and beyond to protect his fellow officers, cagily getting the drop on the Tsarnaevs in the heat of a frenetic and seemingly out of control late-night firefight.

But there's a lot going on, and Berg and his cadre of screen and story writers, a group that includes not only himself but also Matt Cook (The Duel), Joshua Zetumer (Robocop), Paul Tamasy (The Finest Hours) and Eric Johnson (The Fighter), don't always have a firm grasp on it all. They use the fictional character of Tommy Saunders and his relationship with his wife Carol (a wasted Michelle Monaghan) to wrap things around, but mostly he's just there to deliver a couple of empowering speeches and not much else, and if not for Wahlberg's commitment there'd be little interesting about the guy. Additionally, I'm not entirely sure what to make of the Tsarnaev brothers or of Tamerlan's wife Katherine Russell (Melissa Benoist), the movie constantly wavering between trying to humanize the killers or to just paint them as one-dimensional monsters with no real plan.

Still, there's plenty to applaud, not the least of which are examinations of two key characters, MIT police officer Sean Collier (Jake Picking) and Chinese émigré Dun 'Danny' Meng (Jimmy O. Yang). The former valiantly (and tragically) fought the Tsarnaevs when they attempted to steal his gun, while the latter managed to escape from the brothers after they carjacked him, his immediate contacting of the police allowing for the confrontation in Watertown and which led to Sgt. Pugliese's heroics. The film humanizes both of these men in swift, invigorating brushstrokes, Picking and Yang infusing them with depth, grace and charm.

While not as visually resplendent as many of the director's previous efforts, the technical virtuosity of the production is never in doubt. Cinematographer Tobias A. Schliessler (Mr. Holmes) gives things a suitably gritty documentary-like look I found captivating, while editors Gabriel Fleming (Deepwater Horizon) and Colby Parker Jr. (Ant-Man) do a superb job bringing all of the story's disparate tangents together into a seamless whole. It all pulsates to frequent David Fincher collaborators Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross' suitably unnerving score, and much like they did The Social Network and Gone Girl the pair once again craft a sonic landscape that fits things perfectly.

Berg is a good director, sometimes even a great one, but he doesn't always feel the need to explore as deeply or as complexly as all the stories he chooses to tell might benefit all the greater from if he did. But as a tale of communal heroism, as a depiction of what law enforcement can do when the brightest and most dedicated do their jobs to the best of their respective abilities, on that front Patriots Days soars. The film, even with its shortcomings, is a strong reminder that terror and fear will continue to fail as long as everyday people stand up and fight for the rights of their neighbors to live their lives as they see fit, the greatest act of resistance nothing more complicated than that.


Affleck's Prohibition melodrama Live by Night fires nothing but blanks
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

LIVE BY NIGHT
Now playing


Boston native Joe Coughlin (Ben Affleck), the only son of decorated police detective Thomas Coughlin (Brendan Gleeson), has returned home from fighting in WWI disillusioned and angry. Determined to be under the thumb of no one ever again, he turns to a life of crime and robs local gangsters, both Italian and Irish, alongside his best friend Dion Bartolo (Chris Messina). Things are going fine until he becomes involved with the lovely Emma Gould (Sienna Miller), the girlfriend of Irish mob boss Albert White (Robert Glenister), and in order to live another day Joe must go against his best instincts and join forces with Italian don Maso Pescatore (Remo Girone) for protection.

Joe is sent to Florida to jumpstart rum production. Reunited with Dion, the first thing the pair do is to get on the relatively honest Chief Figgis' (Chris Cooper) good side, promising to keep their illegal activities out of the primarily white neighborhoods of his jurisdiction. They also orchestrate a fruitful partnership with Esteban (Miguel J. Pimentel) and Graciela Suarez (Zoe Saldana), the lethal siblings Cuban émigrés who just so happen to mix the smoothest rum in all of Florida. Things are going great until the KKK takes exception to Joe's coziness with the region's Cuban and Black communities, the powerful white supremacists, led by Figgis' estranged relative RD Pruitt (Matthew Maher), taking lethal pleasure in their attempts to destroy his growing business.

Affleck's fourth directorial outing Live by Night is, much like his debut Gone Baby Gone before it, an adaptation of an acclaimed novel written by Dennis Lehane. Unlike that wonderful 2007 mystery-thriller, this Prohibition-era gangster opus isn't very good, the finished film a bloated, by-the-numbers retread that's emotionally flat and devoid of anything passing for a surprise. It's oddly pedestrian, and even though it features stunning camerawork from veteran cinematographer Robert Richardson (The Hateful Eight, Hugo) and crackerjack production design by Jess Gonchor (True Grit), there's very little worth getting excited about. It's a head-scratching failure, and while a purported labor of love for Affleck it's still something of a directorial misstep that wastes a lot of talented actors and technicians on a project that's pretty much dead in the water right from the very beginning.

What's most annoying is that there is a good, maybe even a very good, movie lurking in the middle of all this disjointed chaos and tedium. As stated, everything looks terrific, while the sound design, costumes and score are all of a very high caliber. As for the performances, there are a number of excellent ones, most notably Cooper as the complicatedly authentic Figgis, while Messina steals every scene he's in as Joe's trusted comrade in arms Dion, his fiery devil-may-care attitude giving things a notable kick in the pants whenever he is around.

Problem is, Affleck never gives any of his supporting players their due. Miller disappears just as she's about to get interesting, while Saldana plants the seeds for a fascinating character only to have the script transform her into a faceless homebody pining for her beloved's return and precious little else. Treated even worse is Elle Fanning. Portraying Chief Figgis' starry-eyed daughter Loretta who has a yen to make a name for herself in Hollywood, she undergoes the film's biggest transformation, returning to Florida a haunted victim of abuse and forced drug addiction that's an ethereal specter of her former cheery self. But the movie doesn't know what to do with either Fanning's performance or the character she is portraying, and while the actress has a pair of stunning, magnificently powerful scenes with Affleck, in and of themselves they're just not enough.

It should be said that the director does stage a pair of phenomenal action set pieces; one an early car chase with Joe and his cronies escaping from the police, the latter a superbly staged shoot-out between Joe, Dion and a bevy of baddies inside a swanky Florida hotel. Affleck knows what he's doing during these moments, filling the screen with excitement while he pushes the adrenaline peddle all the way down to the floor. These sort of moments hint at the movie that might have been, making me wonder maybe if he'd been given a little more time to tinker in the editing room the director could have made something worthwhile out of all of this Prohibition gangster pabulum.

Maybe, maybe not, as honestly we'll never really know. The truth is that Live by Night is nothing short of a major disappointment, and from a tired, pointlessly expository voiceover, to overly familiar genre tropes that were trite and old fashioned back when Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney were building their legendary careers making hay out of them, so much of Affleck's latest misfires it's difficult to know where to start. The movie, for all its technical genius, even with such a strong, electrifying cast, just isn't very good, and as such watching it shoot so many blanks for over two full hours is nothing short of a colossal waste of time.


Silly Monster Trucks inoffensively harmless
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

MONSTER TRUCKS
Now playing


For a movie about a newly discovered creature that lives in the deepest recesses of the Earth's crust and eats oil that is inadvertently brought to the surface by an evil industrialist, makes friends with a teenager working at a junkyard and ends up powering his gigantic junky green truck, Monster Trucks is surprisingly watchable. More, the pedigree that brought this dorky, undeniably juvenile idea to the screen is oddly strong. Derek Connolly (Safety Not Guaranteed) wrote the screenplay, while two of the minds behind the story were Kung Fu Panda trilogy impresarios Jonathan Aibel and Glenn Berger. Ice Age creator Chris Wedge is the director (this is his live action debut), while the behind-the-scenes talent includes cinematographer Don Burgess (Forest Gump), editor Conrad Buff (Titanic) and production designer Andrew Menzies (Fury).

None of which means that the movie, already written off by Paramount in their 2016 tax filings for a $100-plus million loss, is some unexpected sensation. It's as ludicrous and as dumb as any potential viewer with even an ounce of brain matter might expect it to be. After all, this is a movie about a teenager, who makes friends with a mysterious monster, that ends up powering his truck, so that the two of them can save the day; there's just no getting around any of that. But for all its pre-release problems, Monster Trucks is, at the very least, shockingly competent, sometimes more than that, and for the intended audience, most likely viewers 10-years-old and younger, probably gets the entertainment job done better than fuddy-duddy adult critics like myself would care (or are willing) to admit.

Tripp (Lucas Till) is a rural North Dakota teen living with his workaholic, recently divorced mother Cindy (Amy Ryan). Looking to get out of town as soon as he graduates, he takes a job at Mr. Weathers' (Danny Glover) junkyard, fixing up a battered old truck with the various spare parts his employer allows him to scrounge. The definition of the stereotypical 'loner,' he's suspicious of his mom's boyfriend, the town sheriff Rick (Barry Pepper), isn't interested in making friends with fellow outcast Sam (Tucker Albrizzi) and is clueless as it pertains to the flirtatious glances sent his direction by his Biology tutor, classmate Meredith (Jane Levy).

Unbeknownst to anyone in town, oil magnate Reece Tenneson (Rob Lowe) has been drilling a gigantic new well on land that hasn't had a full environmental review. After discovering a massive underground river system that connects the whole valley, he orders his team, chiefly lead scientist Jim Dowd (Thomas Lennon), to keep on drilling, no matter what the ethics of doing so might be. What he couldn't plan on was the discovery of a fantastic new creature, one whose very existence would unquestionably catch the eye of the Federal Government and force the shutdown of his incredibly expensive project.

From there, things pretty much progress into something akin to third tier Steven Spielberg territory circa the mid-1980s. The whole thing oozes a familiar E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial meets *batteries not included meets Young Sherlock Holmes vibe, all of it crossed with a kid-friendly Transformers meets Super 8 aesthetic that's at least partially charming. Connolly's script isn't exactly intelligent, but it's just as clearly not nearly as insulting as it could have been, the screenwriter playing up the relationship between Tripp and the orphaned creature that suddenly takes up residence in his truck with a sweet, subtle innocence that's relatively okay.

Not that I can recommend watching this movie with a straight face. I'm not sold on Till as a leading man, and with a cast this stacked with talented veteran character actors (and I haven't even mentioned Holt McCallany or Frank Whaley, both of whom have important central roles key to the narrative's progression) it's a pity Wedge doesn't appear to have the first clue as to what to do with a single one of them. There's also a huge problem as it pertains to the relationship between Tripp and Sam that's close to inexcusable, the film treating the latter so horribly I almost felt like I should be reporting it to someone in authority for being a heartless bully.

Still, it's remarkably well shot, designed and edited, while the visual effects are of a much higher caliber than I anticipated they'd be. Levy, portraying a character diametrically opposite her acclaimed horror turns for director Fede Alvarez in Evil Dead and Don't Breathe, is borderline terrific, her charismatic comedic wholesomeness just glorious. More importantly, young kids with a fondness for Nickelodeon and Disney Channel high-concept comedies will undoubtedly be elated, and if they're inspired to creative endeavors after watching this that's at least one good thing to come out of all this madness we all can applaud. Monster Trucks is dumb, that goes without saying, but it isn't terrible, and as January victories go that's hardly insignificant.


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Queer Resurgence on Capitol Hill Poetry Slam Festival Jan. 22-24
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Spectrum Dance Theater presents World Premiere, SHOT an unapologetic critique of racial profiling and police aggression toward black lives
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Music of Remembrance (MOR) presents Art from Ashes - a free community concert at Benaroya Hall to commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day
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OUTBOUND: 6 LGBT events in 6 cities to travel to this year
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GOLDEN GLOBES: Moonlight, Paulson and Pasek lead LGBT winners
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U2 announces CenturyLink Field concert; Green Day and Ann Wilson launching tours in Seattle
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Scorsese's Silence a grueling exploration of suffering, sacrifice and grace
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Latest Underworld is goofy bloody fun
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Compelling Patriots Day is Boston strong
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Affleck's Prohibition melodrama Live by Night fires nothing but blanks
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