Wednesday, Sep 19, 2018
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 43 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, January 12, 2018 - Volume 46 Issue 02
OPIOID CRISIS: Sen. Murray highlights the need for more resources to help Washington state communities address, prevent opioid misuse
Section One
ALL STORIES
  next story
OPIOID CRISIS: Sen. Murray highlights the need for more resources to help Washington state communities address, prevent opioid misuse

WASHINGTON, DC - [On January 9, 2018], US Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), top Democrat on the Senate health committee, examined the impact of the opioid addiction in Washington state and the government's role in the fight against the opioid epidemic during a committee hearing to discuss how the opioid crisis evolved and the urgent need to respond with additional funding and services.

During the hearing, Sen. Murray heard testimony from Sam Quinones, author of Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic, and emphasized the broad impact of the opioid epidemic, sharing stories from her visits with patients, medical providers, and law enforcement officials throughout Washington state about how opioid misuse affects families and communities. Sen. Murray also criticized the Trump administration for failing to live up to its promises of serious action to address opioid addiction.

As part of her ongoing commitment to help prevent opioid misuse and end the opioid epidemic in Washington state and across the nation, Sen. Murray previously led bipartisan efforts to pass the 21st Century Cures Act and the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), which provide federal investments to help combat opioid misuse and addiction. Through her leadership on the Senate health committee, Sen. Murray will convene additional hearings on the opioid crisis, including a hearing to learn more about how families are impacted by the epidemic.

Key excerpts from Sen. Murray's opening statement:

'...the rise of this epidemic is broader in scope than any one book can tell. There are people from every background and every corner of the country who have stories about the harm that has been done. They are parents who have lost children to an overdose, children who have lost parents to an overdose, veterans in chronic pain who are struggling with addiction, doctors who are treating babies born addicted to opioids, and more.

'I've heard their heartbreaking stories firsthand traveling around Washington state and meeting with doctors, families, and communities fighting this disease. While visiting a local hospital in Longview, the staff there told me that almost one out of every two babies born there have mothers who struggle with substance use. That is stunning. It is heartbreaking. But it is, unfortunately, not the only evidence of this epidemic. Since 2000, nearly 10,000 people in Washington state have died of an opioid overdose.'

'...And when I say this epidemic affects everyone, I don't just mean the individuals facing opioid addiction; there are other victims too. This epidemic hurts families. It leaves children struggling to cope with the impact of their parent's addiction. It leaves many of them in foster homes. It leaves parents shattered with the heartbreak of their child's illness, and leaves many struggling with the financial costs of opioid misuse and treatment and recovery as well.

'And this epidemic hurts our communities as a whole. It takes up resources of public health, hospitals, and law enforcement. It takes workers out of the local economy. It takes a toll on the morale of small towns and big cities alike with each new tragedy.'

'...Mr. Chairman, I look forward to working with you to have all of our members bring their ideas forward so we can work on moving policies that would help families and communities. We must do more to fund prevention efforts and treatment programs and build on the gains made. This means immediately providing supplemental funding states need to implement evidence-based tools that could turn this epidemic around. We need to ensure local stakeholders and partners - the people on the ground who know what works best for their communities - have the resources and information they need to respond to the crisis. It also means going beyond prevention, treatment, and recovery. We must work to support not only the individuals facing addiction but the families and communities who are suffering too.

'I'm interested to hear Mr. Quinones' perspective on how we do that, and again, am grateful to have you with us today.

'If we are going to beat the scourge of opioid addiction, we need to fund and enact solutions that are as comprehensive as this challenge.'

Watch video of Sen. Murray's opening statement at https://youtu.be/b4KJy1kndD4.

The full text of Sen. Murray's opening statement follows:

'Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I'm glad to be continuing our discussion on this important issue.

'I know our witness today has been following the opioid crisis and its growth into the full-blown epidemic families and communities across the nation are facing today.

'Mr. Quinones, thank you for joining us. I'd also like to welcome your wife and daughter. I'm glad they were able to be here with you. I look forward to hearing your perspective on how we can better help communities fight this crisis and support all those whom it has impacted. I appreciate the investigative work you've done to help shed light on this challenge.

'Of course - and I'm sure you would agree - the rise of this epidemic is broader in scope than any one book can tell. There are people from every background and every corner of the country who have stories about the harm that has been done. They are parents who have lost children to an overdose, children who have lost parents to an overdose, veterans in chronic pain who are struggling with addiction, doctors who are treating babies born addicted to opioids, and more.

'I've heard their heartbreaking stories firsthand traveling around Washington state and meeting with doctors, families, and communities fighting this disease. While visiting a local hospital in Longview, the staff there told me that almost one out of every two babies born there have mothers who struggle with substance use. That is stunning. It is heartbreaking. But it is, unfortunately, not the only evidence of this epidemic. Since 2000, nearly 10,000 people in Washington state have died of an opioid overdose.

'And this isn't just happening in Longview; it is happening in local hospitals across the nation. We are losing 91 people every day to opioid overdose. And when I say this epidemic affects everyone, I don't just mean the individuals facing opioid addiction; there are other victims too. This epidemic hurts families. It leaves children struggling to cope with the impact of their parent's addiction. It leaves many of them in foster homes. It leaves parents shattered with the heartbreak of their child's illness, and leaves many struggling with the financial costs of opioid misuse and treatment and recovery as well.

'And this epidemic hurts our communities as a whole. It takes up resources of public health, hospitals, and law enforcement. It takes workers out of the local economy. It takes a toll on the morale of small towns and big cities alike with each new tragedy.

'We are behind the curve on fighting this epidemic.

'One of the stories that stood out to me in your book, Mr. Quinones, was about a state employee from the Washington Department of Labor & Industries, a woman named Jaymie Mai. Jaymie was a pharmacist charged with overseeing the cases of workers receiving prescription drugs for injuries. After six months, Mai noticed that some of these workers were dying from the same painkillers they'd been prescribed. The paper she published in 2005 about the uptick in high-strength opioid prescriptions and deaths was one of the first papers in the country to document the impact of the crisis we face today.

'But she published her paper over a decade ago - which just shows we have been fighting this battle for far too long. And that we must do more.

'Now, I'm glad that we have taken some necessary steps.

'In 2016, Congress passed the 21st Century Cures Act, which included nearly $1 billion of funding for states to address the opioid crisis through prevention, treatment, and recovery efforts. And the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, which supports specific outreach for veterans and pregnant and postpartum women, expands access to medication-assisted treatments, and much more.

'However, there is still work to be done. Along with many of my colleagues I hope that we can move more funding in any upcoming budget or appropriations agreements. First responders, state and local officials, treatment professionals, and families have made it clear that continued federal funding is key to addressing this crisis.

'And unfortunately, while we have heard a lot of talk from the Trump administration on this, we have yet to see the President take the kind of serious action this emergency demands - and that he promised families on the campaign trail. The White House's own Council of Economic Advisors released a report estimating the economic cost of the opioid crisis to be over $500 billion - just for 2015. Addressing a problem this big will take an enormous investment of time, energy, focus - and robust funding. The President's third-quarter paycheck is not going to cut it. Our communities are crying out for serious solutions, not stunts.

'So I am eager to see this committee continue its bipartisan approach and take substantive action to address this epidemic over the next couple months.

'Mr. Chairman, I look forward to working with you to have all of our members bring their ideas forward so we can work on moving policies that would help families and communities. We must do more to fund prevention efforts and treatment programs and build on the gains made. This means immediately providing supplemental funding states need to implement evidence-based tools that could turn this epidemic around. We need to ensure local stakeholders and partners - the people on the ground who know what works best for their communities - have the resources and information they need to respond to the crisis. It also means going beyond prevention, treatment, and recovery. We must work to support not only the individuals facing addiction but the families and communities who are suffering too.

'I'm interested to hear Mr. Quinones' perspective on how we do that and again, am grateful to have you with us today.

'If we are going to beat the scourge of opioid addiction, we need to fund and enact solutions that are as comprehensive as this challenge.

'I look forward to our continued work together.'

Courtesy of Sen. Patty Murray

Tell a friend:

Share on Facebook  Share on Facebook

Post to MySpace!Share on MySpace!

    Share on Delicious

Share on StumbleUpon!

Jenny Durkan sworn in as first woman mayor since 1920s
------------------------------
OPIOID CRISIS: Sen. Murray highlights the need for more resources to help Washington state communities address, prevent opioid misuse
------------------------------
Seattle Pride announces 2018 Parade registration
------------------------------
LGBTQ bar, The Lumber Yard, opens in White Center
------------------------------
Paducah passes LGBT fairness ordinance:
9th Kentucky city with LGBT discrimination protections

------------------------------
SCOTUS will not hear appeal of Mississippi 'religious exemption' law
------------------------------
Looking for funding for your community programs?
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
BREAKING NEWS
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2018 - DigitalTeamWorks 2018

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News