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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, May 11, 2018 - Volume 46 Issue 19
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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SIFF 2018 PREVIEW: An interview with Sebastián Lelio as Seattle's premiere film festival presents two opening weekend screenings of lesbian drama Disobedience
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL
FILM FESTIVAL
May 17 - June 19

DISOBEDIENCE
May 20 & 21

It's that time of year again. Starting next Thursday, the 44th annual Seattle International Film Festival kicks off 25 days of cinematic goodness with the local premiere of Spanish director Isabel Coixet's The Bookshop starring Emily Mortimer, Bill Nighy and Patricia Clarkson. Set in a small English village in 1959, it is the story of a strong-willed, intelligent woman who decides to open a quaint little bookshop, inadvertently causing a cultural and political commotion in the process.

But that is only one of the 168 features, 66 documentaries and 164 short films that will be playing at venues across Seattle and the Pacific Northwest between May 17 and June 10. It's a crazy smorgasbord of cinematic delight that shines a spotlight on films and filmmakers from around the globe who normally don't get such recognition here in the United States. Additionally, this year SIFF will be honoring both Ethan Hawke and Melanie Lynskey with special tributes, each of them bringing their most recent features (First Reformed and Blaze, which he directed, for Hawke; Sadie, directed by local filmmaker Megan Griffiths, for Lynskey) for the audience to discuss, dissect and hopefully enjoy.

Other special events worth mentioning include the SIFF VR Zone at Pacific Place boasting 21 different short films for people to experience, a presentation of the 1911 silent classic L'Inferno at the Triple Door on May 31 with a live score by My Goodness and countless forums at the SIFF Film Center including filmmaker workshops and audience discussions on a variety of engaging topics. Also on the docket, a screening of the 1986 cult favorite Highlander, except presented almost as if it were a silent movie and featuring an explosive, brand new all-Queen score put together exclusively for this screening by DJ NicFit.

One of the notable features playing the first weekend of the festival, a week before it starts its scheduled theatrical run, is A Fantastic Woman director Sebastián Lelio's magnificent new drama Disobedience starring Rachel Weisz, Rachel McAdams and Alessandro Nivola, just one of a number of LGBTQ-friendly titles scheduled to be showcased during SIFF. Based on Naomi Alderman's masterful best-selling novel, the film tells the story of Ronit Krushka (Weisz), a New York photographer who returns to England when she receives a phone call saying that her elderly Orthodox Jewish father has tragically died. Once back home, former friends and family members welcome her back warily, their reasons for doing so ones they do not want to speak out loud about. Only former friends, both now married, Dovid (Nivola) and Esti (McAdams), seem to be pleased by her presence, the three of them reconnecting for the first time since Ronit left their community and headed to the United States.

The movie is a remarkably insightful look at faith, family, friendship, gender, feminism and sexuality that builds slowly to an explosively emotional conclusion. All three actors are stunning, most notably a practically unrecognizable McAdams, Esti's transformation both the most drastic as well as the most authentically heart-wrenching, as the story for the trio progresses to its tearfully insightful climax.

I had the pleasure to briefly chat with Lelio about his English language debut. Here are some of the highlights from that conversation:

Sara Michelle Fetters: Naomi Alderman's novel, how did that come to you? What was it that drew you to the story?

Sebastián Lelio: You know, I made a film called Gloria, and Rachel Weisz and her partner Frieda Torresblanco, they saw the film, and somehow they thought that I could be the right person to direct this adaptation of Naomi's novel. So that's how I got involved, through Rachel who had the rights to the film. So I picked up the book and I loved it. And then the idea of working with Rachel Wiesz was a big factor that made me say yes.

Sara Michelle Fetters: For you and your co-writer, Rebecca Lenkiewicz, how did you attack the book in order to make it feel cinematic? There's so much that's in the book about the minutia of living in that orthodox community that isn't distinctly cinematic. Yet somehow you made me feel like I was right there with Rachel McAdams and Alessandro Nivola, living with them. I didn't need all of that extra stuff that's in the book. How did you two figure that out?

Sebastián Lelio: It was interesting. It was the first time I was working an adaptation, so for me it was a new challenge apart from working in English for the first time. And I'm not Jewish. And I'm not British. So I was pretty much paralyzed at the beginning of the process, I must confess. But then I just connected with [the characters] on a human level. I looked at them as human beings and that was my way of accessing the story. We were working with several consultants during the writing process in order to capture the cultural texture right. Then during the pre-production and shooting process the amount of consultants or advisors increased by more than ten because we were really obsessed with getting it right. After overcoming all of that I really concentrated on what I care about the most, which is the people we are portraying, the human beings, the characters; I want to know who these people are.

Sara Michelle Fetters: I love that you bring that up because, and maybe this helped because of your status as an outsider coming into this story and this world from a different perspective, is that you're able to showcase Ronit in a way where she's not quite an outsider, but still feels like one. She isn't part of this community anymore and it gives things sort of an uncomfortable edge because you know there's going be a shoe to drop at some point.

Sebastián Lelio: Well, in a certain way we are Ronit's spectators, because the secular spectator can relate to her for so many reasons. She's a modern woman living a relatively open life and she feels confident and alive. She's the one that brings us to this unknown world, to this secretive world, to this Land of Oz, if you want. And that's part of the narrative strategy of the film. We go with her and then suddenly the narrative lines expand up to three. Then it's not only Ronit, but it's also Esti, Rachel McAdam's character, and Dovid, Alessandro Nivola's character, the ones that we will observe from that point on. It's more or less like a rock music piece. You start with one line, then you add a second one, then a third one. Sometimes only two of [the characters] are together, but maybe all three of them are coexisting at the same time, creating a beautiful melody. And then we go back to only Ronit. It's a song.

We enjoyed that immensely with Rebecca in the writing process. I really love working with actors and trying to capture something with the camera that is somewhere in the intersection between the character and the human being that is interpreting them [and] bringing [that into] the equation. All of those things combined helped to generate the feeling that we are there, that we are watching not characters, but people that inhabit those spaces. They are real.

Sara Michelle Fetters: Reading the book before watching the movie, I was so worried that somehow Dovid was going to turn into some sort of villainous character. Thankfully, he is just as human and just as humanely treated as you treat Esti and Ronit. That's wonderful.

Sebastián Lelio: For me this is a triangular story, even though the two women are probably stronger because that's where the main forbidden love is taking place. But for me, I've always seen Ronit, Estie and Dovid as one entity. They're like one multidimensional being, if you want. I mean they have been living together for so long, they've known each other since they were kids. One of them escaped and in some eyes she betrayed them. To her eyes, she saved herself. But whatever happened, they are united, they are destined.

I always loved that element. I really enjoyed that with Rebecca and me in the writing process, and then later on while directing and trying to create this journey in which the structure makes you a little bit lost. You don't really know in which direction things are going until probably halfway through the film when the two women kiss. After that, you have no idea how things will unfold. It's really interesting that the climax of the film is taken by the third point of the triangle, by Dovid.

Sara Michelle Fetters: Going back to those two women for a second, the two Rachels, they are just extraordinary. What was that like for you as a director, just watching them work together in such tandem? I can't imagine this movie without either of them.

Sebastián Lelio: That's the thing - they complement one another. I had a strong feeling that they would be amazing together, and beautiful, and a strange, just this beautiful, electrical, explosive, sensual combination. I just feel so grateful that Rachel McAdams accepted this challenge. I think it's so interesting to see her operating in this register, going through the entire emotional spectrum with such elegance and grace and depth. I always knew that they were going to be great. I met them both for the first time once in Canada. I was sitting there when Rachel McAdams and then Rachel Weisz came into the room. When I saw her walking in and sitting down, and they said hello to each other, I was like, this is going to be great! They are just similar and different at the same time. They are both great actresses and so magnetic, you cannot take your eyes off them. I don't know, I just couldn't wait to start. That was my feeling. I was like a kid.

Sara Michelle Fetters: I promised I would keep this short. As much as I want to go crazy about A Fantastic Woman and tell you how much that film means to me, and how extraordinary it is, sadly I'm going to have to hold off. I'm just going to ask you two more questions, if that's all right. The first one, I look at Gloria, I look at A Fantastic Woman, I look at this movie, I feel like they are almost a trilogy, these stories of these strong, complex, creative women. I do wonder, what is it that draws you to these types of women?

Sebastián Lelio: Oh, thank you. Thank you for saying that, about A Fantastic Woman. I appreciate it.

To your question: Profound emotion. Profound connection. It's not part of a strategy or an agenda. I've been following my intuition, and there's something about paying attention to these women that are somehow on the fringes of society and [then] put them in the absolute center and try to create this hopefully complex portrait. And then to see them fall and stand up again, and finding the tools to move on to the next level. There's something about that gesture that touches me, that moves me. The idea of making those films generates enough energy within me. I mean so much energy was in me making these film that I know it's right to tell these stories. I am the one moved in the first place.

Sara Michelle Fetters: Finally, at the end of the day, what do you want people talking about after they watch Disobedience? What do you hope they're saying?

Sebastián Lelio: Hopefully, that they went through a strong cinematic journey. That they lived an experience. More than watching a film, they were confronted with an experience, an experience that says your life is whatever you want. We're free to choose, as the film says. It's my duty to provide an experience. There's something beautiful behind the idea of disobedience, especially in current times. Sometimes disobedience is duty; otherwise we would still be in the Middle Ages.


Cathartically gut-wrenching Tully an emotional powerhouse
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

TULLY
Now playing


Reuniting for the first time since 2011's emotionally eviscerating Young Adult, director Jason Reitman, writer Diablo Cody and producer/star Charlize Theron's funny, charming and in the end devastating chronicle of aging and motherhood Tully is never the movie I expected it to be. Moving in a variety of clever ways, what starts out as some sort of twee chronicle of a working mom with two kids and an unexpected third little one on the way who finds herself revitalized thanks to the pixie magic effervescence of a night nanny sent to give her a hand suddenly becomes something far more profound and meaningful. It makes this transition with a deft ingenuity that is as unforced as it is sublime, the story's final twists packing such a staggering wallop I found myself exiting the theatre in something akin to a state of total awe.

Days away from having her third, and entirely unplanned child, Marlo (Theron) is hanging on by a thread. While her eldest daughter Emmy (Maddie Dixon-Poirier) is as precocious and as inquisitive as they come, kindergartner Jonah (Asher Miles Fallica) might have special needs as he frequently disrupts class and needs his skin 'brushed' every morning before he can come downstairs for breakfast. Marlo's husband Drew (Ron Livingston) means well, and he knows his wife is struggling, but his job frequently sends him out of town on business, and while he's happy to help the kids with their homework when he is at home, all other facets of parenthood sometimes seem beyond his capabilities.

All of which makes the arrival of an infant daughter into this craziness all the more difficult for Marlo. While at first she makes the attempt to keep doing what she's always done in a valiant attempt to maintain the status quo, after an impromptu screaming session directed at her son's elementary school principal in exhausted anger is intermixed with a handful of additional sleep-deprived calamities she decides to make a change. Marlo takes up her wealthy younger brother Craig's (Mark Duplass) offer to provide her with a night nanny, a young woman who will look after her newborn baby from dusk to dawn so she can finally get some rest.

All of which is pretty straightforward, and when the energetic, ebulliently cheerful Tully (Mackenzie Davis) knocks on Marlo's door I immediately got the feeling this was going to be one of those movies where a younger woman helps her older doppelganger reconnect with her past while opening her eyes to the wondrous realities her life currently overflows with. But Cody, Reitman and Theron are playing their cards close to the vest, and soon it becomes apparent all three of them are intent on digging much deeper into topics relating to aging, motherhood and marriage than initially meet the eye. It is a movie that builds to a shattering climax that brought a cascade of tears to my eyes, Marlo's destination as cathartic, and as gut-wrenching, as any I could have imagined before the film began.

The trick is that Cody's script is upfront with how it deals with so many of life's uglier realities. There are no punches pulled. There aren't any issues that are swept under the rug. This is life in all its complicated, hardscrabble anxiety, a place where dreams of youth give way to the weary overweight realties of adulthood and where parents strive to do the right thing by their children even if they're never entirely certain what that is supposed to be. It is a place where families whither in silence, not for lack of love, but because of the absence of communication, complacency transforming into the norm as everyone silently goes through the motions not realizing just how difficult each hour of each day has slowly become.

Reitman doesn't embellish. He allows Cody's screenplay and Theron's withered, fearlessly unfettered magnificence to do all of the heavy lifting. After the uneven, if still entertaining, melodramatics of Labor Day and the unfocused, frustrating mediocrity of Men, Women & Children, Reitman is back in top form, and much like Juno, Up in the Air and Young Adult the unflinching candor of this story is a thing of absolute beauty. While moments of joyous humor abound, it is the merciless manner in which emotional maelstroms grow in strength and ferocity that is what makes this motion picture so special, the naturalistic progression of all that transpires simply wondrous.

But it is Theron who makes this movie soar. As great as she was in recent efforts like Atomic Blonde and Gringo, this is the Oscar-winning actress reminding us all just what sort of titanic, multifaceted powerhouse she truly is. There is a weary physicality to her performance that held me spellbound, and much like her justifiably lauded turns in features as diverse as Monster, North Country, Young Adult and Mad Max: Fury Road proved to be, her work here as Marlo is a showcase of poetic post-partum eloquence that's nothing short of perfect.

It did take me a little while to get swept inside everything Reitman and Cody were trying to say, and as excellent as Davis proves to be, it admittedly took me a moment to warm up to her character, Tully's starry-eyed positivity coming perilously close to becoming grating, especially early on. But it soon becomes apparent that the filmmaking team is playing fast and loose with convention, throwing curveball after curveball as the relationship between Tully and Marlo becomes more and more symbiotic as they inch closer to one another. There's something going on that catapulted me to the edge of my seat as I attempted to put the pieces of this metaphorical puzzle together, and while the resultant twists aren't entirely shocking, their inherent power to amaze is undeniably overwhelming.

I'm not sure what audiences will ultimately think of Tully. The way the final section plays out, even if it isn't unexpected, the reveal, when it comes, is still a major punch in the gut. Additionally, while things are certainly different for Marlo, much like life there is no guarantee the realizations she has made about her marriage and her family are going to end up sticking far into the future. Yet all of this is why Reitman and company's latest dramatic opus is such a phenomenal tour de force, its eventual magnificence grounded in a tactile understanding of the byzantine human conundrums that make life the miraculously demanding marvel it stubbornly cannot help but be.


Mediocre Breaking In a dispiriting home invasion thriller
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

BREAKING IN
Now playing


After the unexpected death of her estranged father, Shaun Russell (Gabrielle Union) heads out to his secluded country home to prepare the multi-acre property for sale. She is joined by her children Jasmine (Ajiona Alexus) and Glover (Seth Carr), her workaholic husband Justin (Jason George) hoping to join them in the next few days. While she hasn't been there in years, Shaun is still somewhat shocked to discover her dad had transformed the property into a veritable fortress, installing a state of the art security system that could lock it down top to bottom within seconds in case the situation to do so might ever arise.

Another thing this wife and mother didn't know? A quartet of criminals led by the aggressively calm Eddie (Billy Burke) have been hiding inside for days, not expecting the dead man's daughter to suddenly arrive. They're after the $4-million in cash hidden inside a safe that's somewhere in the house, and they're not above taking Shaun kids hostage and locking her outside if it might help speed up the process of their getting it. What they didn't count on is that this mother is nobody's wallflower, and she's determined to do whatever it takes to ensure Jasmine and Glover survive the night even if that means she's got to destroy Eddie's crew one member at a time.

Breaking In isn't a good movie. The latest action effort from V for Vendetta and The Raven director James McTeigue, there's very little about this one that's even moderately exciting. Even though set in something akin to real time (Eddie's crew only has 90 minutes to find the money), even with a scenario that inherently overflows in tension, somehow this movie proves to be as forgettable as it is devoid of anything resembling suspense. Ryan Engle's (Rampage) script offers up a decent enough idea and then forgets to bring intelligence, wit or complexity to the proceedings. It all ends up being nothing more than a poorly paced waste of time, the final moments surprisingly exploitive in a way the reminded me more of I Spit on Your Grave or Last House on the Left than they did The Petrified Forest, Key Largo or The Desperate Hours.

Not that any of this is Union's fault. The talented actress is given the center spotlight and does what she can to make the most of her moment. There is a fierce determination to her performance that's undeniably captivating. I loved a scene where she interrogates a member of Eddie's crew, the way her body language slowly and subtly changes as she sits there calmly listening to him eerie in its quiet intensity. It's as if Shaun is letting her inner lioness take control, the passionate emotional dexterity Union displays beyond terrific.

But the movie rarely knows what to do with any of this. Worse, Burke isn't an interesting villain, and there was never a second where I actually found him threatening. As for his compatriots, they're the usual ragtag bunch of wimps and psychos, but none of them are ever all that believable. Only Richard Cabral stands out in any noticeable way, and most of those aren't particularly positive, the way he overplays his hand so completely during the portions of the story where he has to go full-bore psychopathic borderline embarrassing.

I honestly don't know what happened between V for Vendetta and now. Maybe it was the presence of Lana and Lilly Wachowski as producers and screenwriters that grounded him, but McTeigue has just never been able to conjure up anything even close to the same sort of magic in any of his subsequent endeavors behind the camera. Ninja Assassin, The Raven, Survivor, it's almost as if the director keeps growing less and less confident in his craft as time goes by. Here, there's no feeling of urgency, no sense of time, and for a movie that keeps reminding its evil characters they're on a ticking time clock before the police arrive you'd think they were all preparing for a dinner party and not trying to abscond with millions of dollars in cash.

I do like Union an awful lot, and for her fans maybe this is a change-of-pace performance they might be interested in taking a look at. I was also suitably impressed with Cece Destefano's (Happy Death Day) production design, and I couldn't help but wish McTeigue would have spent a little more time exploring that massive house before all the mayhem and carnage made doing so a lot more difficult. All that being so, I still found Breaking In to be spectacularly difficult to sit through, its overall mediocrity a continual source of frustration that I kept feeling long after the film itself had come to its anemically dispiriting end.


Agreeably goofy Life an endearing collegiate comedy
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

LIFE OF THE PARTY
Now playing


After her husband Dan (Matt Walsh) announces he wants a divorce on the day they drop their only daughter Maddie (Molly Gordon) off at college for her senior year of school, longtime housewife Deanna Miles (Melissa McCarthy) is understandably upset. While initially content to commiserate with her longtime best friend Christine (Maya Rudolph), after thinking on things Deanna comes to a realization. While they were in college, she put her dreams of earning her archeology degree on hold so she and Dan could start a family, always thinking she'd go back and finish her final year of college at a later date. But 'later' never happened. With nothing to lose Deanna returns to school, re-enrolling as a senior alongside her initially dumbfounded, if eventually elated daughter Maddie, the two Miles women taking college by storm as they both strive to achieve their respective dreams.

Teaming up and co-writing the script with her director husband Ben Falcone for the third time, Life of the Party is a huge step up from the almost unwatchable, if still oddly ambitious, mediocrity of Tammy and The Boss. While less edgy, while not as interested in pushing boundaries or creating an aggressive mixture of comedy and drama as those two features were, this pleasant little piece of overly familiar fluff is nonetheless moderately entertaining. It's a captivating bit of comedic comfort food, and while a little too reminiscent of the 1986 Rodney Dangerfield favorite Back to School, McCarthy and Falcone still acquit themselves nicely, and as such this is a movie I end up finding it surprisingly difficult to say anything all that bad about.

Don't get me wrong. The supporting characterizations are thin and nondescript, almost as if McCarthy and Falcone watched films like Neighbors, The House Bunny, Legally Blonde and the aforementioned Back to School and decided to see if they could create situations and characters that would purposefully blur the line between homage and plagiarism. If you ask me to tell you anything concrete about the young women portraying Maddie's sorority housemates I could honestly say precious little other than the actress who portrays Helen, a.k.a. 'Coma Girl' (the nickname makes sense when you watch the movie), Gillian Jacobs, goes all out and does whatever she can to get a laugh. If you were to ask me why veterans like Rudolph, Stephen Root, Jacki Weaver and Chris Parnell decided to be in this for any other reasons than their friendship with the filmmakers or to pick up a quick paycheck I don't think I could come up with an alternative rationale anyone might find believable.

The thing is, all of them are still fairly funny, each getting just enough time to do something interesting or amusing to make their presence worthwhile. Additionally, I honestly liked just how friendly and strangely polite this movie proved to be. This is especially true of the sorority sisters played by Jacobs, Jessie Ennis and Adria Arjona. Their characters embrace Deanna instantaneously, opening their hearts to her as if she were just another woman residing in their house. As aggressive as some of the putdowns involving Dan and his affair with an aggressively narcissistic realtor (deftly portrayed by a ferociously venal Julie Bowen) might be, overall there is a layer of kindness and respect to this story that's charming. It all just made me smile and feel good about myself, and considering how hard both Tammy and The Boss worked to make me feel the opposite, this ended up being a fairly wonderful turn of events to say the least.

Some gags go on a little longer than necessary, while a climactic sorority house party to help Deanna stay in school doesn't exactly go anyplace unexpected or interesting. Even a surprise cameo ends up feeling a little half-baked, almost as if this musical surprise was an idea McCarthy and Falcone had at the last second and found some way to throw into the proceedings. Some of the more ungainly pieces just refuse to fit together, while others feel as if they were extracted from a completely different, far less engaging comedy I'd rather not have had to sit there and watch.

But even this feels like a minor flaw, and Life of the Party thankfully rebounds rather quickly at the end to go out on a couple of heartwarming scenes of family, sisterhood and the pursuit of educational achievement that's suitably endearing. McCarthy gives a lively performance overflowing with peppy enthusiasm and emotional complexity, her chemistry with Gordon a continual delight. Even if this isn't a film I'm going to be thinking about much longer than the time it takes to write this review, it still makes me feel good enough that I'm happy I gave it a look, the overall positivity with which Deanna chooses to live her life undeniably infectious.


SIFF film screenings: Dawnland and Holy Angels at the Seattle Public Library May 26
Join the Seattle Public Library, Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) and Longhouse Media for a free screening and panel discussion of Dawnland, a documentary that follows the untold narrative of Indigenous child removal in the United States, on Saturday, May 26 from 1pm to 4pm at the Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., Level 1, Microsoft Auditorium, (206) 386-4636. The screening will be preceded by the short film, Holy Angels.

Library programs are free and open to the public. Registration is not required. Parking is available in the Central Library garage for $7.

Stolen children, racism, devastated families and cultural genocide encompass this documentary about government-sanctioned atrocities committed against Native Americans in the United States - in particular, the Wabanaki people of Maine. Dawnland depicts the work of the first truth and reconciliation commission for Native Americans as it gathers stories and documents the history of Native American children removed from their homes and culture and placed in white communities.

SCHEDULE
1:00pm - Reception

1:30pm - Screenings of Holy Angels and Dawnland

3:00pm - Post-film discussion with Tracy Rector, moderator and co-founder of Longhouse Media; Sandy White Hawk, consultant for Indian Child Welfare; Mishy Lesser, learning director for the Upstander Project

This event is the first of three screenings of films by and about Indigenous people to be held at the Seattle Public Library in 2018. Each film was selected by local filmmaker Tracy Rector in a project that grew out of recommendations from the Library's Native Advisory Council. Watch for additional films in October and December.

This program is made possible with support from The Seattle Public Library Foundation. It is presented in partnership with SIFF and Longhouse Media.

For more information, call the Seattle Public Library at (206) 386-4636 or visit https://www.spl.org/. For ADA accommodations, please contact: leap@spl.org.


Seattle Opera's Aida full of spectacular moments
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Funny family themes feel Familiar at Seattle Rep
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It's May; it's May theater openings
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Seattle Opera's Aida puts the 'grand' in grand opera
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Seattle Humane - Pets of the Week
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SIFF 2018 PREVIEW: An interview with Sebastián Lelio as Seattle's premiere film festival presents two opening weekend screenings of lesbian drama Disobedience
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Cathartically gut-wrenching Tully an emotional powerhouse
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Mediocre Breaking In a dispiriting home invasion thriller
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Agreeably goofy Life an endearing collegiate comedy
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